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Don't wait to get concussion care; early treatment may mean faster recovery

January 06, 2020

PITTSBURGH, Jan. 6, 2020 - Early clinical treatment may significantly reduce recovery time following a concussion, according to new research led by the University of Pittsburgh Sports Medicine Concussion Program.

The results, published today in JAMA Neurology, suggest delays in seeking treatment can lead to unnecessarily longer recovery.

"Our study emphasizes the importance of seeking appropriate, specialized care early on. Delaying clinical care following a concussion leaves patients to deal with symptoms on their own and negates the positive effects of early and targeted interventions," said senior author Anthony Kontos, Ph.D., research director at Pitt's Sports Medicine Concussion Program.

A concussion is a mild traumatic brain injury caused by a jolt to the head or body that disrupts the function of the brain. This injury can result in physical, cognitive, emotional and/or sleep-related symptoms that may or may not involve a loss of consciousness. The symptoms can last from several minutes, to days, weeks, months or longer.

Kontos and his team analyzed 162 athletes with diagnosed concussion injuries between the ages of 12 and 22 years. Athletes treated within the first week of injury recovered faster than athletes who did not receive care until eight days to three weeks after injury. Once in care, the length of time spent recovering was the same for athletes evaluated within the first week of injury compared to those evaluated eight days to three weeks post-injury, indicating the days before initial clinical care was the primary driver for the longer recovery duration.

"Early clinical care including behavioral management interventions and targeted exertion, vestibular and oculomotor rehabilitation exercises also may minimize missed time at work, school or sports, helping the patient return to a normal routine sooner," said Michael "Micky" Collins, Ph.D., executive and clinical director, UPMC Sports Medicine Program.

Kontos and his colleagues say future research should look into the biological reasons why earlier engagement with care promotes faster recovery, as well as explore whether their findings could apply to other types of patients, such as military personnel.
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Co-authors include Michael Collins, Ph.D., Alicia Trbovich, Ph.D., Nathan Ernst, Psy.D., Kouros Emami, Psy.D., Brandon Gillie, Ph.D., Jonathan French, Psy.D., and Cyndi Holland, M.P.H., all of Pitt; Kendra Jorgensen-Wagers, Ph.D., of Landstuhl Regional Medical Center; and R.J. Elbin, Ph.D., of University of Arkansas.

To read this release online or share it, visit https://www.upmc.com/media/news/010620-kontos-early-treatment-jama [when embargo lifts].

About the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine

As one of the nation's leading academic centers for biomedical research, the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine integrates advanced technology with basic science across a broad range of disciplines in a continuous quest to harness the power of new knowledge and improve the human condition. Driven mainly by the School of Medicine and its affiliates, Pitt has ranked among the top 10 recipients of funding from the National Institutes of Health since 1998. In rankings recently released by the National Science Foundation, Pitt ranked fifth among all American universities in total federal science and engineering research and development support.

Likewise, the School of Medicine is equally committed to advancing the quality and strength of its medical and graduate education programs, for which it is recognized as an innovative leader, and to training highly skilled, compassionate clinicians and creative scientists well-equipped to engage in world-class research. The School of Medicine is the academic partner of UPMC, which has collaborated with the University to raise the standard of medical excellence in Pittsburgh and to position health care as a driving force behind the region's economy. For more information about the School of Medicine, see http://www.medschool.pitt.edu.

http://www.upmc.com/media

Contact: Rick Pietzak
Office: 412-864-4151
Mobile: 412-523-6922
E-mail: PietzakR@upmc.edu

Contact: Taylor Andres
Office: 412-578-9193
Mobile: 412-592-7406
E-mail: AndresTA@upmc.edu

University of Pittsburgh

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