Special focus issue on sepsis

January 07, 2014

A special issue on sepsis has been released by the publisher Landes Bioscience (Austin, TX USA). The articles contained in this special issue of the journal Virulence have been authored by world-class investigators and provide new insights into both the pathogen-related factors and the host defense mechanisms that lead to septic shock and contribute to its resolution or fatal outcome.

Sepsis, or septic shock, is an excessive inflammatory response in answer to a serious infection, most commonly by bacteria, but also fungi, viruses, and parasites. Different microbial components, such as bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS), endotoxins, or exotoxins can cause the typical septic inflammatory cascade. The condition can continue even after the infection that caused it is gone. It is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Characteristics of sepsis are massive release of proinflammatory cytokines resulting in tissue damage, an uncontrolled reduction in blood-pressure, multiple organ failure, and death. Sepsis can originate anywhere microbes can gain entry to the body, common sites including the genitourinary tract, the liver and its bile ducts, the gastrointestinal tract, and the lungs. The condition is often life-threatening, especially in people with a weakened immune system or other medical issues.

Dr. Steven Opal from Alpert Medical School of Brown University (Pawtucket, RI USA) has worked with the editorial team of Virulence to organize this special issue on sepsis. Over 20 papers in this issue discuss many different aspects of sepsis and septic shock, such as epidemiology of severe sepsis (Sachin Yende), gender differences in sepsis (Irshad Chaudry), systemic inflammatory response syndrome (Robert Balk), the PIRO model (John Marshall), host innate immune responses to sepsis (Willem Joost Wieringa), the changing immune system in sepsis (Jonathan Boomer), pathogenesis of bacteremia (Eirini Christaki), role of mitochondrial dysfunction in sepsis-induced multi-organ failure (Mervyn Singer), pathophysiology of microcirculatory dysfunction and the pathogenesis of septic shock (Daniel De Backer), an alternate pathophysiologic paradigm of sepsis and septic shock--implications for optimizing antimicrobial therapy (Anand Kumar), meningococcal disease and the complement system (Lisa Lewis and Sanjay Ram), contribution of group A streptococcal virulence determinants to the pathogenesis of sepsis (Shiranee Sriskandan), the complex link between influenza and severe sepsis (Diana Florescu), animal models of sepsis (Mitchell Fink), invasive candidiasis as a cause of sepsis (Thierry Calandra), neonatal sepsis (James Padbury), pediatric sepsis (Adrienne Randolph), clinical controversies in the management of patients with severe sepsis (Simon Finfer), clinical impact of multidrug-resistant gram-negative bacilli in the management of septic shock (Aurora Pop-Vicas), bacterial toxins in sepsis (Girish Ramachandran), anti-endotoxin vaccines (Alan Cross), bacteriophage therapy (Xavier Wittebole), rapid diagnosis of sepsis (Konrad Reinhart), and severe sepsis and septic shock--management and performance improvement (Christa Schorr).

In an accompanying editorial, Dr. Opal highlights the importance of this collection of review articles, providing a detailed summary of the current knowledge and science of septic shock research, extending from the molecular to the population level. He writes, "Septic shock continues to pose formidable challenges for emergency room physicians, critical care specialists, surgeons, and infectious disease clinicians alike in caring for these critically ill patients. Early recognition of sepsis and improved therapies to manage the multi-organ dysfunction that frequently follows sepsis pathophysiology remain major unmet medical needs."
-end-
To view all articles in the special issue, visit the following link: http://www.landesbioscience.com/journals/virulence/toc/volume/5/issue/1/

Landes Bioscience

Related Sepsis Articles from Brightsurf:

Hormone involved in obesity is a risk factor for sepsis
A group of scientists from Instituto Gulbenkian de Ciência (IGC), led by Luís Moita, discovered that a hormone that has been pointed out as a treatment for obesity reduces the resistance to infection caused by bacteria and is a risk factor for sepsis.

Antihypotensive agent disrupts the immune system in sepsis
Patients who go into shock caused by sepsis (septic shock) are treated with the antihypotensive agent norepinephrine.

Milestone for the early detection of sepsis
Researchers from Graz, Austria, are developing a ground-breaking method that uses biomarkers to detect sepsis 2 to 3 days before the first clinical symptoms appear.

Breast milk may help prevent sepsis in preemies
Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., have found -- in newborn mice -- that a component of breast milk may help protect premature babies from developing life-threatening sepsis.

Finding a new way to fight late-stage sepsis
Researchers have developed a way to prop up a struggling immune system to enable its fight against sepsis, a deadly condition resulting from the body's extreme reaction to infection.

Study: Sepsis survivors require follow-up support
Survivors of sepsis -- a life-threatening response to an infection -- have expressed a need for advocacy and follow-up support, according to a study authored by professors at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, and the University of Tennessee Health Science Center in Memphis, and published in Dimensions of Critical Care Nursing.

After decades of little progress, researchers may be catching up to sepsis
After decades of little or no progress, biomedical researchers are finally making some headway at detecting and treating sepsis, a deadly medical complication that sends a surge of pathogenic infection through the body and remains a major public health problem.

Study changes guidelines for sepsis management
University of Arizona Health Sciences researcher ends debate among physicians regarding sepsis management.

Improving outcomes for sepsis patients
More than 1 million sepsis survivors are discharged annually from acute care hospitals in the United States.

Genes linked to death from sepsis ID'd in mice
Bacteria in the bloodstream can trigger an overwhelming immune response that causes sepsis.

Read More: Sepsis News and Sepsis Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.
Can't connect to localhost. Errorcode: 1203