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Changes in flavored tobacco product use among youth tobacco users

January 07, 2019

BottomLine: Self-reported use of flavored tobacco products by middle and high school students decreased from 2014 to 2016 but climbed back up in 2017 in an analysis of national survey data. Flavored noncigarette tobacco products are widely available in the U.S. This study examined changes in self-reported use of flavored tobacco products by youth who use tobacco. The analysis included more than 78,0000 students from a combined 2014 to 2017 national school-based annual survey. The use of any tobacco product dropped from 17.3 percent in 2014 to 13.6 percent in 2017. While the use of flavored tobacco products by those who use tobacco decreased from 69.4 percent in 2014 to 57.7 percent in 2016, it increased again to 63.6 percent between 2016-2017 and much of that appears due to flavor use in electronic cigarettes.

Authors: Hongying Dai, PhD, College of Public Health, University of Nebraska, Omaha.
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To Learn More: The full study is available on the For The Media website.

(doi:10.1001/jamapediatrics.2018.4595)

Editor's Note: The article includes funding/support disclosures. Please see the article for additional information, including other authors, author contributions and affiliations, financial disclosures, funding and support, etc.

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JAMA Pediatrics

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