COVID-19 and dental and dental hygiene students' career plans

January 07, 2021

Alexandria, Va., USA -- The COVID-19 pandemic has significantly impacted dental education and training. The study "COVID-19 and Dental and Dental Hygiene Students' Career Plans," published in the JDR Clinical & Translational Research (JDR CTR), examined the short-term impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on dental hygiene and dental students' career intentions.

An anonymous online survey was emailed to dental and dental hygiene students enrolled at Virginia Commonwealth University School of Dentistry, Richmond, USA. The survey consisted of 81 questions that covered a wide range of topics including demographics, anticipated educational debt, career plans post-graduation, readiness to enter clinical practice or residency and student wellness. The authors found that students at all levels of training have become concerned about the limited employment opportunities, long-term stability of the dental profession and on the interruptions to clinical education and licensure examinations consequent to the pandemic.

More than 10% of all student study respondents felt anxious about the future of dentistry, with approximately 40% of those in their final year choosing to change their career post-graduation plans. Students who reported an intent to change their career plans had significantly higher perceived stress and anxiety scores and lower resilience scores than students who reported no change to their career plans. Compared to white students, more black, indigenous and people of color reported that they had changed their career plans.

Lead author Dina Garcia of Virginia Commonwealth University concluded, "A comprehensive effort inclusive of adeptly designed clinical and curriculum experiences paired with wellness interventions and support tailored to students is needed."

"The impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the career plans of dental and dental hygiene students may negatively affect the future dental workforce," said JDR CTR Editor-in-Chief Jocelyne S. Feine, McGill University, Montréal, Quebec, Canada. "We lack understanding of both the short-term and long-term effects of prolonged and unanticipated public health crises on the dental workforce. More studies are needed to provide this information so that these issues can be appropriately addressed."
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About the JDR Clinical and Translational Research

The JDR Clinical & Translational Research is a quarterly publication. This peer-reviewed journal is dedicated to publishing original dental, oral and craniofacial research at the interface between discovery science and clinical application with the translation of research into healthcare delivery systems at the individual patient, clinical practice and community levels. The JDR CTR has been accepted for inclusion in MEDLINE.

International Association for Dental Research

The International Association for Dental Research (IADR) is a nonprofit organization with over 10,000 individual members worldwide, with a Mission to drive dental, oral and craniofacial research to advance health and well-being worldwide. To learn more, visit http://www.iadr.org. The American Association for Dental Research (AADR) is the largest Division of IADR with 3,100 members in the United States. To learn more, visit http://www.iadr.org/aadr.

International & American Associations for Dental Research

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