Tracking the formation of the early heart, cell by cell

January 07, 2021

Richard Tyser and colleagues have mapped the origins of the embryonic mouse heart at single-cell resolution, helping to define the cell types that make up the heart in the earliest days of development. Their techniques allowed them to identify for a first time a pool of progenitor cells that contributes to the formation of heart muscle cells as well as the early epicardium, the outermost layer of the heart. This layer provides cells and other proteins that guide the development and repair of heart tissue, so a better understanding of its origins could better inform regenerative heart therapies as well as improve our understanding of congenital heart defects. Tyser et al. performed a micro-dissection of a portion of the embryonic mouse heart to observe a very early stage streak of cells called the cardiac crescent transform into the linear heart tube. Combining single-cell RNA sequencing to identify cell types with high-resolution imaging and time-lapse microscopy, the researchers were able to follow the development of distinct populations of progenitor heart cells over about 12 hours of development.
-end-


American Association for the Advancement of Science

Related Congenital Heart Defects Articles from Brightsurf:

Cutting-edge, whole-heart imaging provides new details on heart defects
A cutting-edge technique that allows scientists to zoom into tiny details in a 3D image of a whole animal heart may lead to new insights on congenital heart disease.

Congenital heart defects may not increase the risk of severe COVID-19 symptoms
People with congenital heart disease had a lower-than-expected risk for severe symptoms from COVID-19, a new study has found.

Rare congenital heart defect rescued by protease inhibition
A research team at the Greenwood Genetic Center (GGC) has successfully used small molecules to restore normal heart and valve development in an animal model for Mucolipidosis II (ML II), a rare genetic disorder.

Gout treatment may aid patients with congenital heart disease
A drug used to treat gout, probenecid, may improve heart function in individuals with a particular heart defect, according to results from a small pilot study run by a University of Cincinnati researcher.

Congenital heart disease more deadly in low-income countries
Even though mortality from congenital heart disease (CHD) has declined over the last three decades as diagnosis and treatments have advanced, a new study shows that the chances for a child to survive a CHD diagnosis significantly differs based on the country where he or she is born.

Genomics experts dispute nine genes linked to congenital heart condition
The Clinical Genome Resource's (ClinGen) expert panel has critically reevaluated the scientific evidence for all 17 reported genes linked to long QT syndrome, disputing nine of the genes and revealing only three of the genes to be definitively associated with the most common form of the disease.

Physicians should consider HCQ to reduce the risk of recurrent congenital heart block
New research findings presented at the 2019 ACR/ARP Annual Meeting discovered that hydroxychloroquine (HCQ) significantly reduces the recurrence rate of congenital heart block in subsequent pregnancies of women with anti-SSA/ Ro antibodies, regardless of their health status.

Faulty signalling pathway linked to congenital heart condition
Faulty signalling pathway causes the heart to develop unnaturally while in the embryo stage, according to Duke-NUS Medical School researchers.

A new framework to study congenital heart defects
In a new study published in the scientific journal Nature, a team of researchers at the Gladstone Institutes, in collaboration with the University of Luxembourg, reveal for the first time the full spectrum of cells that come together to make a heart at the earliest stages of embryo formation.

Greater prevalence of congenital heart defects in high intensity oil and gas areas
Mothers living near more intense oil and gas development activity have a 40-70% higher chance of having children with congenital heart defects (CHDs) compared to those living in areas of less intense activity, according to a new study from researchers at the Colorado School of Public Health.

Read More: Congenital Heart Defects News and Congenital Heart Defects Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.