Nav: Home

NOAA's GOES-S, T and U satellites are shaping up

January 08, 2016

As NOAA's GOES-R satellite goes through mechanical testing in preparation for launch in October 2016, the remaining satellites in the series (GOES-S, T, and U) are also making significant progress.

Six new instruments will fly aboard each of the GOES-R series satellites: Advanced Baseline Imager (ABI), Extreme Ultraviolet and X-ray Irradiance Sensors (EXIS), Geostationary Lightning Mapper (GLM), Magnetometer, Space Environment In Situ Suite (SEISS), and Solar Ultraviolet Imager (SUVI). In addition to these instruments the spacecraft itself, known as the "bus," antennas, flight hardware and software, and other components are also being completed.

Together, the instruments will offer advanced imaging with increased resolution and faster coverage for more accurate forecasts of environmental phenomena like: severe storms, fog, fire, aerosols and volcanic ash, as well as real-time mapping of lightning activity. The instruments will also enable NOAA's Space Weather Prediction Center to significantly improve forecasts of space weather hazards.

GOES-S Satellite Progress

All GOES-S instruments have been delivered for integration with the satellite and SUVI and EXIS are already installed on the sun-pointing platform. Significant progress has been made on the GOES-S spacecraft itself. Integration and test of the system module, the "brain" of the satellite, is complete. The "body" of the satellite, the core module comprising a majority of the structure and propulsion systems, was delivered in October. These modules were mated to form the spacecraft in late December.

GOES-S recently completed the technical portion of its system integration review, in which an independent team, spanning several engineering disciplines, determined that the flight and ground segment components are ready for integration with the overall GOES system. The review team also assessed the readiness of the facilities, support personnel, plans and procedures for integration of the GOES-S satellite.

GOES-T Satellite Progress

Development of GOES-T components is also underway. The EXIS instrument completed its pre-shipment review in September, and instrument will be kept in storage until it is ready for integration with the GOES-T spacecraft. The boom of the Magnetometer is also complete.

SEISS and SUVI are undergoing environmental testing to ensure they are prepared to withstand the rigors of launch and operation in the extreme environment of space. ABI has completed environmental testing and will undergo its pre-shipment review in early 2016. The GOES-T GLM is in development.

GOES-U Satellite Progress

Many of the GOES-U components are under development, while some have been completed and are undergoing testing. The EXIS instrument completed thermal vacuum testing to ensure it can withstand the extreme hot and cold temperatures of space, while the GOES-U ABI is currently in thermal vacuum testing. Three of the GOES-U SEISS components are complete as well as the Magnetometer boom. SUVI is preparing for environmental testing and GLM is in the development stage.

GOES-R Launches This Year

GOES-R is scheduled for launch in October 2016. Once launched, the GOES-R satellite will be placed in a checkout orbit at 89.5 degrees. After an extended validation phase of approximately one year, the satellite will transition immediately into operations. The satellite's operational location (75 degrees West or 137 degrees West) will be determined by NOAA's Office of Satellite and Product Operations based on the health and performance of the current GOES constellation.
-end-
For more detail about each instrument in the GOES-R series, visit:

http://www.goes-r.gov/spacesegment/instruments.html

Video explaining what goes into building a GOES satellite:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V3iNsjFmX1U

NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Related Satellite Articles:

NASA looks at extreme Florida rainfall by satellite
Extremely heavy rain has recently fallen over Florida and the Global Precipitation Measurement or GPM mission core satellite looked at that some of that rainfall on June 7.
First solar images from NOAA's GOES-16 satellite
The first images from the Solar Ultraviolet Imager or SUVI instrument aboard NOAA's GOES-16 satellite have been successful, capturing a large coronal hole on Jan.
Falsifying Galileo satellite signals will become more difficult
The European Union activated its Galileo satellite navigation system in December 2016.
Using satellite images to better target vaccination
Vaccination campaigns can improve prevention and control of disease of outbreaks in the developing world by using satellite images to capture short-term changes in population size.
GOES-3 satellite decommissioned
The National Science Foundation (NSF) in late June decommissioned a 38-year-old communications satellite that for 21 years had helped to link NSF's Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station with the outside world.
Predicting poverty by satellite with detailed accuracy
By combining satellite data and sophisticated machine learning, researchers have developed a technique to estimate household consumption and income.
The world's first wireless satellite
A satellite whose components are not connected through electric cables but miniaturised radio modules: This innovation has earned two computer scientists from the University of W├╝rzburg the first place in the INNOspace Masters competition.
Tracking deer by NASA satellite
Mule deer mothers are in sync with their environment, with reproduction patterns that closely match the cycles of plant growth in their habitat.
Satellite shows Tropical Depression 9 weakening
NOAA's GOES-East satellite captured an image of Tropical Depression 9 weakening in the Central Atlantic on Sept.
How to get rid of a satellite after its retirement
Researchers at University of La Rioja have developed a new method to eliminate artificial satellites in Highly Elliptical Orbits when they finish their mission.

Related Satellite Reading:

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Setbacks
Failure can feel lonely and final. But can we learn from failure, even reframe it, to feel more like a temporary setback? This hour, TED speakers on changing a crushing defeat into a stepping stone. Guests include entrepreneur Leticia Gasca, psychology professor Alison Ledgerwood, astronomer Phil Plait, former professional athlete Charly Haversat, and UPS training manager Jon Bowers.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#524 The Human Network
What does a network of humans look like and how does it work? How does information spread? How do decisions and opinions spread? What gets distorted as it moves through the network and why? This week we dig into the ins and outs of human networks with Matthew Jackson, Professor of Economics at Stanford University and author of the book "The Human Network: How Your Social Position Determines Your Power, Beliefs, and Behaviours".