Nav: Home

Cambrian integrative stratigraphy and timescale of China

January 08, 2019

The Cambrian Period is the first period of the Phanerozoic Eon of our planet Earth and witnessed the explosive appearance of the metazoans, representing the beginning of the modern earth-life system characterized by animals in contrary to the Precambrian earth-life system dominated by microbial life. However, understanding Cambrian earth-life system evolution is hampered by absence of a high-resolution timescale.

The review article by Maoyan Zhu (Nanjing Institute of Geology and Palaeontology, Chinese Academy of Sciences) and his colleagues briefly summarized the historical narrative, recent advances and problems of the present international Cambrian chronostratigraphic framework and timescale. In particular, the article provide insightful discussions on the long-standing problem how to subdivision of the lower half of Cambrian Period in which the animals appeared on Earth abruptly (called the "Cambrian Explosion").

The highlight of the review is that the authors challenged the recognition of the Cambrian base through intensive analyses of the deficiency of the GSSP (Global Boundary Stratotype Section and Point) for the Cambrian base which was defined by the FAD of the ichonspecies Treptichnus pedum (Fig.1) at the Fortune Head section, Burin Peninsula, Newfoundland, Canada. Based on recent studies that (1) the Ediacaran and Cambrian skeletal faunas are transitional (Zhu et al., Geology, 2018, 45:459-462); (2) the complex trace fossils are widespread in the Ediacaran Period, including Treptichnus-type trace and bilaterian trackways (Chen et al., Sci. Adv. 2018, 4: eaao6691); and (3) new high-resolution zircon U-Pb dating, authors proposed that a prominent global carbon isotope negative excursion at the basal Cambrian (BACE excursion) should be the primary marker to define the Cambrian base with an age of 539 Ma which is 2 million years younger than that in the present International Chronstratigraphic Chart.

. Meanwhile, authors revised the Cambrian chronostratigraphy of China and proposed a new Xiaotanian Stage for the Cambrian Stage 2 of China. In addition, authors further summarized the integrative stratigraphy of South China, North China and Tarim platforms respectively.
-end-
See the article:

ZHU Maoyan, YANG Aihua, YUAN Jinliang, LI Guoxiang, ZHANG Junming, ZHAO Fangchen, Soo-AHN Yeun, MIAO Lanyun. 2019. Cambrian chronostratigraphy and timescale of China. Science China Earth Sciences, 62(1): 25-60

https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs11430-017-9291-0

Science China Press

Related Geology Articles:

EARTH -- Illustrating geology
In the August issue of EARTH Magazine, explore some of geology's most historic images, and hear from experts about what made these depictions so valuable to the field and why they continue to be useful educational resources.
The July 2016 issue of Geology is now online
The July 2016 issue of the Geological Society of America's flagship journal, Geology, includes two open-access features: 'Pre-Mississippian tectonic affinity across the Canada Basin-Arctic margins of Alaska and Canada,' by David W.
The geology of wine
Every day, all around the world, millions of people contemplate a very simple question with a very complex answer: which wine?
Virtual time machine of Earth's geology now in the cloud
Cloud-based virtual globes developed by a team led by University of Sydney geologists mean anyone with a smartphone, laptop or computer can now visualize, with unprecedented speed and ease of use, how the Earth evolved geologically.
EARTH: Urban geology
More than half of the total human population on Earth lives in urban areas, where, like rural areas, geology affects us every day.
Geology 101
Geologist Arthur Sylvester's new highway guide explores the iconic features of the Southern California landscape.
What do lentils have to do with geology?
When clayey materials are compressed and sheared, they commonly develop a 'scaly fabric' wherein the clay is divided by braided shear surfaces into lentil-shaped chips.
Connecting people and geology on volcanoes
Luke Bowman, who received his Ph.D. from Michigan Tech this summer, gets to the heart of geohazards on the San Vicente Volcano in El Salvador.
Walking with mammoths and exploring mid-continental geology
Geoscientists from the north-central US and beyond will convene in Lincoln, Nebraska, USA, on April 24-25, to discuss new science, expand on existing science, and explore the unique geologic and historic features of the region, with a special emphasis on applied geology, paleontology, and mid-continent geology.
New geology research explores intriguing questions
Can spaceborne radar help predict sinkholes? What do ancient ambers reveal about paleochemotaxonomy?

Related Geology Reading:

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Setbacks
Failure can feel lonely and final. But can we learn from failure, even reframe it, to feel more like a temporary setback? This hour, TED speakers on changing a crushing defeat into a stepping stone. Guests include entrepreneur Leticia Gasca, psychology professor Alison Ledgerwood, astronomer Phil Plait, former professional athlete Charly Haversat, and UPS training manager Jon Bowers.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#524 The Human Network
What does a network of humans look like and how does it work? How does information spread? How do decisions and opinions spread? What gets distorted as it moves through the network and why? This week we dig into the ins and outs of human networks with Matthew Jackson, Professor of Economics at Stanford University and author of the book "The Human Network: How Your Social Position Determines Your Power, Beliefs, and Behaviours".