JCI early table of contents for Jan. 9, 2014

January 09, 2014

Engineered anti-toxin antibodies improve efficacy

The effectiveness of toxin-neutralizing antibodies is considered to be mediated through the interaction of the variable region of the antibody and the toxin; however, recent studies suggest that the constant region (Fc) of antibodies also influence efficacy. In this issue of the Journal of Clinical Investigation, Jeffrey Ravetch and colleagues at The Rockefeller University demonstrate that engineering the Fc domain of anti-toxin antibodies increases toxin neutralization activity through enhancing the interaction between toxin-targeting antibodies and the Fc receptor on immune cells. The authors found that mice expressing humanized FcR were better protected from anthrax toxin when given engineered anti-anthrax toxin antibodies. This study suggests that engineering the Fc domains of antibodies can be used as a strategy to enhance antibody efficacy.

TITLE: Human IgG Fc domain engineering enhances antitoxin neutralizing antibody activity

AUTHOR CONTACT: Jeffrey V. Ravetch
The Rockefeller University, New York, NY, USA
Phone: 212-327-7323; Fax: ; E-mail: ravetch@rockefeller.edu

View this article at:http://www.jci.org/articles/view/72676?key=2cb7f03d851cec347394




Mice exposed to retinoid deficiency in utero exhibit bronchial hyperresponsiveness as adults

Individuals with asthma and COPD are subject to debilitating bronchospasm as a result of airways that are hyperresponsive to stimuli. Factors that lead to the development of airway hyperresponsiveness are not well characterized. In this issue of the Journal of Clinical Investigation, Wellington Cardoso and colleagues at the Boston University School of Medicine reveal that mice born to mothers with retinoid deficiency during pregnancy are at increased risk of developing airway hyperesponsiveness. Prenatal retinoid deficiency promoted altered airway development and lung differentiation. Bronchial hyperresponsiveness and abnormal phenotypes persisted throughout the postnatal period regardless for vitamin A status in the adult. These results suggest that retinoid signaling in the lung is important for proper airway development and prevention of inappropriate pulmonary inflammatory responses.

TITLE: Prenatal retinoid deficiency leads to airway hyperresponsiveness in adult mice

AUTHOR CONTACT: Wellington V. Cardoso
Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA, USA
Phone: 671 638-6198; Fax: 671 536-8093; E-mail: wcardoso@bu.edu

View this article at: http://www.jci.org/articles/view/70291?key=37b3b43a181cf53304a1




ALSO IN THIS ISSUE

TITLE: Phenothiazines induce PP2A-mediated apoptosis in T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

AUTHOR CONTACT: Jon Aster
Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA
Phone: 617-525-4370; Fax: 617-525-4422; E-mail: jaster@partners.org

View this article at:http://www.jci.org/articles/view/65093?key=0f5ac5d75428c5eaa32b

TITLE:Tgfbr2 disruption in postnatal smooth muscle impairs aortic wall homeostasis

AUTHOR CONTACT: George Tellides
Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA
Phone: 203 737-2298; Fax: 203 737-6386; E-mail: george.tellides@yale.edu

View this article at: http://www.jci.org/articles/view/69942?key=75cba8bf3a88ff849fba

TITLE: Disruption of vascular Ca2+-activated chloride currents lowers blood pressure

AUTHOR CONTACT: Christian A. Hübner
Institut für Humangenetik, Universitätsklinikum Jena
Phone:0049.3641.935500; Fax: 0049.3641.935502; E-mail: christian.huebner@med.uni-jena.de

View this article at: http://www.jci.org/articles/view/70025?key=be69ce64dd38ecfffac3

TITLE: Neuronal ferritin heavy chain and drug abuse affect HIV-associated cognitive dysfunction

AUTHOR CONTACT: Olimpia Meucci
Drexel University College of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA, USA
Phone: 215 762 2597; E-mail: omeucci@drexelmed.edu

View this article at: http://www.jci.org/articles/view/70090?key=6c3d0ec77e82d312c1b1
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