Nav: Home

The legal battle over CRISPR (video)

January 09, 2017

WASHINGTON, Jan. 9, 2017 -- CRISPR could potentially engineer super crops, make designer animal models for research and even snip out genetic diseases. Experts say that billions of dollars are at stake. But the landmark technology is embroiled in a legal battle over who controls the patent on CRISPR. The latest episode of Speaking of Chemistry highlights everything you need to know about biotech's biggest patent case -- watch it here: https://youtu.be/IboHEQumDGc.
-end-
Speaking of Chemistry is a production of Chemical & Engineering News, a weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society. It's the series that keeps you up to date with the important and fascinating chemistry shaping the world around you. Subscribe to the series at http://bit.ly/ACSReactions, and follow us on Twitter @CENMag.

Subscribe to the series at http://bit.ly/ACSReactions, and follow us on Twitter @ACSreactions to be the first to see our latest videos.

The American Chemical Society is a nonprofit organization chartered by the U.S. Congress. With nearly 157,000 members, ACS is the world's largest scientific society and a global leader in providing access to chemistry-related research through its multiple databases, peer-reviewed journals and scientific conferences. The American Chemical Society does not conduct research, but publishes and publicizes peer-reviewed scientific studies. Its main offices are in Washington, D.C., and Columbus, Ohio.

To automatically receive news releases from the American Chemical Society, contact newsroom@acs.org">newsroom@acs.org.

Follow us: TwitterFacebook

American Chemical Society

Related Genetic Diseases Articles:

Powerful new genomics method can be used to reveal the causes of rare genetic diseases
The technique, which appears in the latest issue of Science, makes use of the fact that people inherit two copies or ''alleles'' of virtually every gene, one from the mother and one from the father.
From centenarians' genetic code, a potential new therapy against cardiovascular diseases
Some people live much longer than average, partly thanks to their DNA.
Summit charts a course to uncover the origins of genetic diseases
A team led by Ivaylo Ivanov of Georgia State University used the 200-petaflop IBM AC922 Summit system, the world's smartest and most powerful supercomputer, to develop an integrative model of the transcription preinitiation complex (PIC), a complex of proteins vital to gene expression.
New screening approach helps identify sources of rare genetic diseases in children
Scientists are using a new approach to pinpoint the causes of rare genetic diseases in children and identify treatment options faster than with traditional methods.
A speedier pipeline to diagnosing genetic diseases in seriously ill infants
Building on previous research, scientists have made improvements to an artificial intelligence pipeline used to diagnose genetic diseases via blood samples obtained from gravely ill infants in a San Diego-based children's hospital.
Researchers use machine-learning system to diagnose genetic diseases
San Diego-Researchers at Rady Children's Institute for Genomic Medicine (RCIGM) have utilized a machine-learning process and clinical natural language processing (CNLP) to diagnose rare genetic diseases in record time.
Rare gut condition a model for study of genetic diseases
A study published online in the April 11, 2019 edition of the New England Journal of Medicine found that Hirschsprung disease is more predictable from an individual's genetic makeup than previously thought.
Selfish genetic elements amplify inflammation and age-related diseases
Researchers from the University of Rochester show that LINE1 retrotransposons, a class of selfish genetic elements, become more active with age and may cause age-related diseases by triggering inflammation.
A common genetic signature has been discovered among three cancer prone rare skin diseases
A group of researchers lead by a lecturer from the Universidad Carlos III de Madrid (UC3M), Marcela del Río, from the CIEMAT, the Rare Diseases Networking Biomedical Research Centre (Initials in Spanish: CIBERER-- ISCIII) and Fundación Jiménez Díaz has identified a common genetic signature among three rare skin diseases or genodermatoses: recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa, Kindler syndrome and xeroderma pigmentosum.
Aging and chronic diseases share genetic factors, study reveals
The study published today in Communications Biology used clinical and genomic data of 300,477 British individuals from UK Biobank to show that the most prevalent chronic conditions such as cancer, diabetes, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, stroke, dementia, and some others share the common underlying mechanism, that is aging itself, and discover genetic factors associated with healthspan, also known as healthy life expectancy.
More Genetic Diseases News and Genetic Diseases Current Events

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Rethinking Anger
Anger is universal and complex: it can be quiet, festering, justified, vengeful, and destructive. This hour, TED speakers explore the many sides of anger, why we need it, and who's allowed to feel it. Guests include psychologists Ryan Martin and Russell Kolts, writer Soraya Chemaly, former talk radio host Lisa Fritsch, and business professor Dan Moshavi.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#538 Nobels and Astrophysics
This week we start with this year's physics Nobel Prize awarded to Jim Peebles, Michel Mayor, and Didier Queloz and finish with a discussion of the Nobel Prizes as a way to award and highlight important science. Are they still relevant? When science breakthroughs are built on the backs of hundreds -- and sometimes thousands -- of people's hard work, how do you pick just three to highlight? Join host Rachelle Saunders and astrophysicist, author, and science communicator Ethan Siegel for their chat about astrophysics and Nobel Prizes.