Place of residence linked to heart failure risk

January 09, 2018

Location. Location. Location.

When buying and selling real estate, the phrase is a realtor's mantra.

It is also the central theme of a recently released journal report on factors that can predict heart failure risk.

According to new research in the American Heart Association journal, Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes, almost 5 percent of heart failure risk was connected to neighborhood factors.

"What we have now found is evidence suggesting that characteristics of your place of residence play a significant role in influencing heart failure risks above and beyond an individual's cardiovascular risk factors and socioeconomic indicators of individual income and educational level," said Loren Lipworth, Sc.D., research associate professor of Medicine at Vanderbilt University Medical Center and co-senior author of the paper. "Prior evidence has shown that a person's socioeconomic information is a predictor for chronic disease.

"What our findings imply is that there is an opportunity for possible interventions that center on the community related to availability of resources like exercise outlets, healthy food choices and medical facilities."

The study compared census tract data on socioeconomic deprivation - a collection of neighborhood-level variables of wealth, education, occupation and housing patterns - and heart failure rates among 27,078 middle-aged participants from Southeastern states. The participants were from the Southern Community Cohort Study, an ongoing prospective investigation of cancer and other chronic conditions in a largely resource-limited, underinsured group living in 12 Southeastern states.

More than 50 percent of the participants lived in the most deprived neighborhoods. Seventy percent earned less than $15,000 annually; nearly 39 percent had less than a high-school education and 44 percent were obese.

During a median of five years of follow-up in the study, 4,300 participants were diagnosed with heart failure.

"The local environment in which we live matters to our health," said Deepak Gupta, MD, assistant professor of Medicine at Vanderbilt and co-senior author. "The surprise in our results was the magnitude to which neighborhood characteristics account for the risk of heart failure."

Gupta, a cardiologist, said individualized treatment to reduce traditional risk factors like hypertension, diabetes and obesity may not be enough to prevent heart failure and hopes fellow cardiologists will appreciate the breadth of what influences a patient's health.

"Hopefully our findings will motivate some current and future physicians to expand our roles in healthcare delivery and advocacy to opportunities outside of standard clinic and hospital-based practice," said Gupta.

The researchers hope the findings raise awareness among prevention and public policy advocates to consider the role of environment and community health resources in the evaluation of health risks.

"Public policy professionals need to pay attention to the neighborhood, not just the individuals, because your place of residence does predict your risk of heart failure," said Elvis Akwo, MD, PhD, first author of the study and a research fellow at the Medical Center. "Improved community-level resources may ultimately reduce the risk of heart failure in these communities.

"These are merely suggestions on what could have some impact. We hope that our study will open the door for experimental studies for interventions and what kinds of measures can be tested to improve the cardiovascular health of entire communities, not just one person at a time."
-end-


Vanderbilt University Medical Center

Related Heart Failure Articles from Brightsurf:

Top Science Tip Sheet on heart failure, heart muscle cells, heart attack and atrial fibrillation results
Newly discovered pathway may have potential for treating heart failure - New research model helps predict heart muscle cells' impact on heart function after injury - New mass spectrometry approach generates libraries of glycans in human heart tissue - Understanding heart damage after heart attack and treatment may provide clues for prevention - Understanding atrial fibrillation's effects on heart cells may help find treatments - New research may lead to therapy for heart failure caused by ICI cancer medication

Machining the heart: New predictor for helping to beat chronic heart failure
Researchers from Kanazawa University have used machine learning to predict which classes of chronic heart failure patients are most likely to experience heart failure death, and which are most likely to develop an arrhythmic death or sudden cardiac death.

Heart attacks, heart failure, stroke: COVID-19's dangerous cardiovascular complications
A new guide from emergency medicine doctors details the potentially deadly cardiovascular complications COVID-19 can cause.

Autoimmunity-associated heart dilation tied to heart-failure risk in type 1 diabetes
In people with type 1 diabetes without known cardiovascular disease, the presence of autoantibodies against heart muscle proteins was associated with cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging evidence of increased volume of the left ventricle (the heart's main pumping chamber), increased muscle mass, and reduced pumping function (ejection fraction), features that are associated with higher risk of failure in the general population

Transcendental Meditation prevents abnormal enlargement of the heart, reduces chronic heart failure
A randomized controlled study recently published in the Hypertension issue of Ethnicity & Disease found the Transcendental Meditation (TM) technique helps prevent abnormal enlargement of the heart compared to health education (HE) controls.

Beta blocker use identified as hospitalization risk factor in 'stiff heart' heart failure
A new study links the use of beta-blockers to heart failure hospitalizations among those with the common 'stiff heart' heart failure subtype.

Type 2 diabetes may affect heart structure and increase complications and death among heart failure patients of Asian ethnicity
The combination of heart failure and Type 2 diabetes can lead to structural changes in the heart, poorer quality of life and increased risk of death, according to a multi-country study in Asia.

Preventive drug therapy may increase right-sided heart failure risk in patients who receive heart devices
Patients treated preemptively with drugs to reduce the risk of right-sided heart failure after heart device implantation may experience the opposite effect and develop heart failure and post-operative bleeding more often than patients not receiving the drugs.

How the enzyme lipoxygenase drives heart failure after heart attacks
Heart failure after a heart attack is a global epidemic leading to heart failure pathology.

Novel heart pump shows superior outcomes in advanced heart failure
Severely ill patients with advanced heart failure who received a novel heart pump -- the HeartMate 3 left ventricular assist device (LVAD) -- suffered significantly fewer strokes, pump-related blood clots and bleeding episodes after two years, compared with similar patients who received an older, more established pump, according to research presented at the American College of Cardiology's 68th Annual Scientific Session.

Read More: Heart Failure News and Heart Failure Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.