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More than five percent of family physicians did not attempt recertification

January 09, 2018

Of 51,678 family physicians who received board certification between 1980 and 2000, 5.6 percent did not attempt to recertify, with a slight increase in the most recent cohort. The percentage not attempting recertification increased with each additional failed initial certification attempt, rising to 24 percent for diplomates who failed three or more times. International medical graduates, men, and older diplomates were more likely to not attempt recertification. According to the authors, attrition from board certification may be a transitional step between burnout and leaving the primary care workforce. Medical boards' shift to maintenance of certification programs has also provoked fears of attrition. The authors recommend following these trends, uncovering underlying motivations, and identifying new interventions to minimize attrition.
-end-
Predictors of Attrition From Family Medicine Board Certification
Winston Liaw, MD, MPH, et al
Robert Graham Center, Washington, DC
http://www.annfammed.org/content/16/1/55.full

American Academy of Family Physicians

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