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Investigational cream may help patients with inflammatory skin disease

January 09, 2019

A study published in the British Journal of Dermatology indicates that an investigational nonsteroidal topical cream (PAC-14028) may be effective for treating atopic dermatitis, one of the most common inflammatory skin diseases.

The trial involved a cream that blocks the transient receptor potential vanilloid subfamily, member 1, an ion channel involved in the perception of pain. This channel also contributes to inflammation and itchy skin in patients with atopic dermatitis.

In the 8-week, randomized, double-blind, multicentre, study that enrolled 194 adults with mild to moderate atopic dermatitis, the cream improved clinical symptoms and signs with a favourable safety profile.

According to the authors, a phase III clinical trial is underway to test if the topical medicine is safe and effective in teens and adults.
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Wiley

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