By using recorded audio feedback academics can reduce workload mentally and physically

January 09, 2019

Academics experience that by using the Recorded Audio Feedback (RAF) in higher education they can give more relaxed and dialogic feedback for their learners and reduce their own workload both mentally and physically.

Recorded Audio Feedback (RAF) is one method for providing feedback for learners that is becoming increasingly popular, especially in e-Education. RAF can be defined as formative or summative messages that are recorded and distributed by academics as digital audio files to individual learners or learner groups in response to both on-going and submitted work. Academics' experiences of using recorded audio feedback (RAF) in higher e-Education were studied at the University of Jyväskylä in the Faculty of Information Technology and at the Tampere University of Technology.

- Based on case academics' experiences they felt that by using RAF they can provide learners more relaxed and dialogic feedback. Academics could use their tone of voice to add semantics, for example be supportive, instructive, critical in constructive way, motivational or conversational. This way the participants also felt relaxed when talking to their learners via RAF and that RAF is personal and fun to work with, says Senior Lecturer Anneli Heimbürger from the University of Jyväskylä.

- At the same time academics reduce their own workload both mentally and physically. The cognitive load decreased when speaking the dialect of his/her own instead of using literary language, as usual in emails. For physical aspects, for example eyestrain decreases with RAF compared to working with display terminals. Participants reported approximated 30% - 50% saving of working time compared to time used when writing feedback via emails, tells Senior Lecturer Ville Isomöttönen from the University of Jyväskylä.

- RAF is also pedagogically flexible. All case academics reported the scalability of RAF, in other words that RAF can be used with different types of learners' writing assignments such as course reports, group works, individual works, learning diaries, theses and article drafts, continues Heimbürger.

According to previous studies, most learners have an overall positive attitude towards RAF. However, many of the studies have been carried out only from learners' point of view.

- To complement RAF research, the aim of our study was to shed light on how academics experience using RAF as a feedback method, explains Lecturer Harri Keto from Tampere University of Technology.
-end-
The RAF study results were presented and discussed in IEEE Frontiers in Education Conference in San Jose, USA.

Further information:

University of Jyväskylä, Faculty of Information Technology, Senior Lecturer Anneli Heimbürger, anneli.a.heimburger@jyu.fi, tel. +358 50 428 5271

University of Jyväskylä, Faculty of Information Technology, Senior Lecturer Ville Isomöttönen, ville.isomottonen@jyu.fi

Heimbürger, A., Isomöttönen V., Keto, H. and Nieminen, P. (2018). How do Academics Experience Use of Recorded Audio Feedback in Higher Education? A Thematic Analysis. IEEE Frontiers in Education Conference, FIE 2018, October 18 - 21, 2018 Indianapolis, Indiana, USA. To be published in IEEE Xplore Digital Library.

Heimbürger, A. and Isomöttönen V. (2017). Moderating Cultural Effects in a Higher e-Education? Supervisor's Tone of Voice in Recorded Audio Feedback. IEEE Frontiers in Education Conference, FIE2017, October 18 - 21, 2017 Indianapolis, Indiana, USA. https://ieeexplore.ieee.org/document/8190646.

Heimbürger, A. (2018). Using Recorded Audio Feedback in Cross-Cultural e-Education Environments to Enhance Assessment Practices in a Higher Education. Advances in Applied Sociology, Vol. 8, No. 2, pp. 106-124. doi:10.4236/aasoci.2018.82007.

University of Jyväskylä - Jyväskylän yliopisto

Related Education Articles from Brightsurf:

Applying artificial intelligence to science education
A new review published in the Journal of Research in Science Teaching highlights the potential of machine learning--a subset of artificial intelligence--in science education.

Dementia education
School-based dementia education could deliver much needed empathy and understanding for older generations as new research from the University of South Australia shows it can significantly improve dementia knowledge and awareness among younger generations.

How can education researchers support education and public health and institutions during COVID-19?
As education researchers' ongoing work is interrupted by school closures, what can they do to support education and public health institutions dealing with the Covid-19 pandemic?

Online education platforms could scale high-quality STEM education for universities
Online and blended (online and in-person) STEM instruction can produce the same learning outcomes for students as traditional, in-person classes at a fraction of the cost, finds research published today in Science Advances.

Technology in higher education: learning with it instead of from it
Technology has shifted the way that professors teach students in higher education.

The new racial disparity in special education
Racial disparity in special education is growing, and it's more complex than previously thought.

Education may be key to a healthier, wealthier US
A first-of-its-kind study estimate the economic value of education for better health and longevity.

How education may stave off cognitive decline
Prefrontal brain regions linked to higher educational attainment are characterized by increased expression of genes involved in neurotransmission and immunity, finds a study of healthy older adults published in JNeurosci.

Does more education stem political violence?
In a study released online today in Review of Educational Research, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Educational Research Association, three Norwegian researchers attempt to bring clarity to this question by undertaking the first systematic examination of quantitative research on this topic.

Individual education programs not being used as intended in special education
Gone are the days when students with disabilities were placed in a separate classroom, or even in a completely different part of the school.

Read More: Education News and Education Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.