Nav: Home

By using recorded audio feedback academics can reduce workload mentally and physically

January 09, 2019

Academics experience that by using the Recorded Audio Feedback (RAF) in higher education they can give more relaxed and dialogic feedback for their learners and reduce their own workload both mentally and physically.

Recorded Audio Feedback (RAF) is one method for providing feedback for learners that is becoming increasingly popular, especially in e-Education. RAF can be defined as formative or summative messages that are recorded and distributed by academics as digital audio files to individual learners or learner groups in response to both on-going and submitted work. Academics' experiences of using recorded audio feedback (RAF) in higher e-Education were studied at the University of Jyväskylä in the Faculty of Information Technology and at the Tampere University of Technology.

- Based on case academics' experiences they felt that by using RAF they can provide learners more relaxed and dialogic feedback. Academics could use their tone of voice to add semantics, for example be supportive, instructive, critical in constructive way, motivational or conversational. This way the participants also felt relaxed when talking to their learners via RAF and that RAF is personal and fun to work with, says Senior Lecturer Anneli Heimbürger from the University of Jyväskylä.

- At the same time academics reduce their own workload both mentally and physically. The cognitive load decreased when speaking the dialect of his/her own instead of using literary language, as usual in emails. For physical aspects, for example eyestrain decreases with RAF compared to working with display terminals. Participants reported approximated 30% - 50% saving of working time compared to time used when writing feedback via emails, tells Senior Lecturer Ville Isomöttönen from the University of Jyväskylä.

- RAF is also pedagogically flexible. All case academics reported the scalability of RAF, in other words that RAF can be used with different types of learners' writing assignments such as course reports, group works, individual works, learning diaries, theses and article drafts, continues Heimbürger.

According to previous studies, most learners have an overall positive attitude towards RAF. However, many of the studies have been carried out only from learners' point of view.

- To complement RAF research, the aim of our study was to shed light on how academics experience using RAF as a feedback method, explains Lecturer Harri Keto from Tampere University of Technology.
-end-
The RAF study results were presented and discussed in IEEE Frontiers in Education Conference in San Jose, USA.

Further information:

University of Jyväskylä, Faculty of Information Technology, Senior Lecturer Anneli Heimbürger, anneli.a.heimburger@jyu.fi, tel. +358 50 428 5271

University of Jyväskylä, Faculty of Information Technology, Senior Lecturer Ville Isomöttönen, ville.isomottonen@jyu.fi

Heimbürger, A., Isomöttönen V., Keto, H. and Nieminen, P. (2018). How do Academics Experience Use of Recorded Audio Feedback in Higher Education? A Thematic Analysis. IEEE Frontiers in Education Conference, FIE 2018, October 18 - 21, 2018 Indianapolis, Indiana, USA. To be published in IEEE Xplore Digital Library.

Heimbürger, A. and Isomöttönen V. (2017). Moderating Cultural Effects in a Higher e-Education? Supervisor's Tone of Voice in Recorded Audio Feedback. IEEE Frontiers in Education Conference, FIE2017, October 18 - 21, 2017 Indianapolis, Indiana, USA. https://ieeexplore.ieee.org/document/8190646.

Heimbürger, A. (2018). Using Recorded Audio Feedback in Cross-Cultural e-Education Environments to Enhance Assessment Practices in a Higher Education. Advances in Applied Sociology, Vol. 8, No. 2, pp. 106-124. doi:10.4236/aasoci.2018.82007.

University of Jyväskylä - Jyväskylän yliopisto

Related Education Articles:

Education a top priority
Various studies have revealed that a majority of Western European populations support increased investment in education.
Dementia on the downslide, especially among people with more education
In a hopeful sign for the health of the nation's brains, the percentage of American seniors with dementia is dropping, a new study finds.
A vision for revamping neuroscience education
The expanding scope and growing number of tools used for neuroscience is moving beyond what is taught in traditional graduate programs, say leaders in American neuroscience education, funding, and policy.
Scientific education through films?
Magic swords, wands, cauldrons and cloaks of invisibility do not exist in reality.
What should be the role of computer games in education?
Game advocates are calling for a sweeping transformation of conventional education to replace traditional curricula with game-based instruction.
Up, up and away, in the name of science education
US researchers extol the virtues of high-altitude balloons for science education in a research paper published in the International Journal of Learning Technology.
Minorities underrepresented in US special education classrooms
Although minority children are frequently reported to be overrepresented in special education classrooms, a team of researchers suggests that minority children are less likely than otherwise similar white children to receive help for disabilities.
Accentuate the positive when it comes to nutrition education
If you want people to choose healthier foods, emphasize the positive, says a new Cornell University study.
How do students use video in higher education?
A new SAGE white paper out today reveals the types of educational videos that appeal to students and where they go to find them.

Related Education Reading:

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Don't Fear Math
Why do many of us hate, even fear math? Why are we convinced we're bad at it? This hour, TED speakers explore the myths we tell ourselves and how changing our approach can unlock the beauty of math. Guests include budgeting specialist Phylecia Jones, mathematician and educator Dan Finkel, math teacher Eddie Woo, educator Masha Gershman, and radio personality and eternal math nerd Adam Spencer.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#517 Life in Plastic, Not Fantastic
Our modern lives run on plastic. It's in the computers and phones we use. It's in our clothing, it wraps our food. It surrounds us every day, and when we throw it out, it's devastating for the environment. This week we air a live show we recorded at the 2019 Advancement of Science meeting in Washington, D.C., where Bethany Brookshire sat down with three plastics researchers - Christina Simkanin, Chelsea Rochman, and Jennifer Provencher - and a live audience to discuss plastics in our oceans. Where they are, where they are going, and what they carry with them. Related links:...