Nav: Home

Psoriasis: Towards a novel therapeutic approach

January 09, 2020

Psoriasis is a frequent skin inflammatory disorder affecting 3% of the population. Psoriasis is characterized by hyperproliferation and defect of epidermal differentiation, leading to the scaly appearance of the skin. The psoriasis skin also presents an increase in blood vessels, leading to the redness of the skin lesions and is associated with immune infiltration.

The cross talk between immune cells, blood vessels and keratinocytes have been previously shown to be crucial for psoriasis development. However, the respective role of each of these populations in the psoriasis initiation has been a matter of debates. Vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGFA) is the principal factor responsible for the formation of new blood vessels.

Despite the well-known role of VEGFA in promoting psoriasis, it remains unclear whether VEGFA acts only on blood vessels, which in turns mediate recruitment of inflammatory cells and defect of epidermis differentiation or whether VEGFA also acts directly on the skin epidermis to orchestrate psoriasis development.

In a study published in Science Advances, researchers lead by Pr. Cédric Blanpain, MD/PhD, WELBIO investigator and Professor at the Université libre de Bruxelles, Belgium now provide evidence that targeting VEGFA signaling in the epidermis prevents psoriasis development.

To address this key question, Benhadou and colleagues used a mouse model overexpressing VEGFA, which induces a psoriatic like disease recapitulating the hallmarks of human psoriasis. By combining VEGFA overexpression and the genetic deletion of VEGFA receptor (VEGFR1) and co-receptor (Nrp1) in the skin epidermis, the authors demonstrate that the deletion of Nrp1 or Flt1 prevents psoriasis development. "It was very surprising to find that inhibiting VEGFA signaling only in the epidermis was sufficient to completely prevent psoriasis development including immune cell infiltration and increase in blood vessel formation mediated by VEGFA overexpression" comments Dr Farida Benhadou, the first author of this study.

To assess whether inhibiting Nrp1/Vegfa interaction can be of therapeutic relevance for the treatment of psoriasis, Benhadou and colleagues administrated a therapeutic anti-Nrp1 antibody that block the interaction between Vegfa and Nrp1 to mice presenting psoriasis. Administration of Nrp1 blocking antibodies induced a rapid disappearance of psoriatic lesions. "These data demonstrate the therapeutic benefit of blocking Vegfa/Nrp1 interaction in the treatment of psoriatic disease, which may be safer for the treatment of psoriasis as compared to other therapeutic modalities that can be associated with serious side effects" comments Cédric Blanpain, the senior author of this study.

Altogether this new study demonstrates the essential role of Flt1 and Nrp1expression in the skin epidermis to mediate psoriasis development. The results of this study have important implications for the understanding of mechanisms leading to psoriasis, one of the most frequent inflammatory diseases, and for the treatment of patients with psoriasis.
-end-
This work was supported by the Fonds Erasme, the ULB foundation, the FNRS and WELBIO.

Université libre de Bruxelles

Related Blood Vessels Articles:

Feeling the pressure: How blood vessels sense their environment
Researchers from the University of Tsukuba discovered that Thbs1 is a key extracellular mediator of mechanotransduction upon mechanical stress.
Human textiles to repair blood vessels
As the leading cause of mortality worldwide, cardiovascular diseases claim over 17 million lives each year, according to World Health Organization estimates.
How high levels of blood fat cause inflammation and damage kidneys and blood vessels
Viral and bacterial infections are not the only causes of inflammation of body tissue.
3D printing, bioinks create implantable blood vessels
A biomimetic blood vessel was fabricated using a modified 3D cell printing technique and bioinks.
When blood vessels are overly permeable
In Germany alone there are around 400,000 patients who suffer from chronic inflammatory bowel diseases.
Nicotine-free e-cigarettes can damage blood vessels
A Penn study reveals single instance of vaping immediately leads to reduced vascular function.
Creating blood vessels on demand
Researchers discover new cell population that can help in regenerative processes.
Self-sustaining, bioengineered blood vessels could replace damaged vessels in patients
A research team has bioengineered blood vessels that safely and effectively integrated into the native circulatory systems of 60 patients with end-stage kidney failure over a four-year phase 2 clinical trial.
Found: the missing ingredient to grow blood vessels
Researchers have discovered an ingredient vital for proper blood vessel formation that explains why numerous promising treatments have failed.
How sickled red blood cells stick to blood vessels
An MIT study describes how sickled red blood cells get stuck in tiny blood vessels of patients with sickle-cell disease.
More Blood Vessels News and Blood Vessels Current Events

Trending Science News

Current Coronavirus (COVID-19) News

Top Science Podcasts

We have hand picked the top science podcasts of 2020.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

TED Radio Wow-er
School's out, but many kids–and their parents–are still stuck at home. Let's keep learning together. Special guest Guy Raz joins Manoush for an hour packed with TED science lessons for everyone.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#565 The Great Wide Indoors
We're all spending a bit more time indoors this summer than we probably figured. But did you ever stop to think about why the places we live and work as designed the way they are? And how they could be designed better? We're talking with Emily Anthes about her new book "The Great Indoors: The Surprising Science of how Buildings Shape our Behavior, Health and Happiness".
Now Playing: Radiolab

The Third. A TED Talk.
Jad gives a TED talk about his life as a journalist and how Radiolab has evolved over the years. Here's how TED described it:How do you end a story? Host of Radiolab Jad Abumrad tells how his search for an answer led him home to the mountains of Tennessee, where he met an unexpected teacher: Dolly Parton.Jad Nicholas Abumrad is a Lebanese-American radio host, composer and producer. He is the founder of the syndicated public radio program Radiolab, which is broadcast on over 600 radio stations nationwide and is downloaded more than 120 million times a year as a podcast. He also created More Perfect, a podcast that tells the stories behind the Supreme Court's most famous decisions. And most recently, Dolly Parton's America, a nine-episode podcast exploring the life and times of the iconic country music star. Abumrad has received three Peabody Awards and was named a MacArthur Fellow in 2011.