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Landmark study proves Oral-B® power toothbrush technology superior in reducing plaque and gingivitis

January 11, 2003

BOSTON, MA, January 11, 2003 -- Nearly four decades of research conclude that power toothbrushes with rotation oscillation action, such as the Oral-B 3D Excel, are demonstrably more effective in removing plaque and reducing gingivitis than other types of power toothbrushes -- including those featuring "sonic" technology -- according to an international study announced today at the Forsyth Institute conference on evidence-based dentistry.

Half of adults age 18 or older have some evidence of gingivitis, the earliest form of periodontal disease. Gingivitis is reversible with professional treatment and good at-home oral care, but if left untreated, can lead to periodontal disease and possible tooth and bone loss.

The comprehensive study, conducted by the Cochrane Collaboration, a British-based non-profit health research group, reviewed data from all available published studies conducted between 1964 and 2001, involving more than 2,500 participants. The study independently concluded that toothbrushes that rotate and oscillate, a technology pioneered by Oral-B in 1991, are more effective than any other type of toothbrush -- manual or "sonic" -- in reducing plaque and gingivitis.

"For over a decade, consumers and the dental community have been bombarded with conflicting information about which type of toothbrushes -- manual, power or "sonic" -- work best," said Dr. Paul Warren, Vice President of Clinical Research for Oral-B. "This study clears up any confusion and conclusively proves that Oral-B power toothbrush technology is superior in keeping teeth and gums healthy."

The flagship Oral-B 3D Excel power toothbrush builds upon the original rotation oscillation movement with a patented 3D technology that adds high-speed in-and-out pulsations. With its unique combination of the compact brush head and the patented 3D action, the Oral-B 3D Excel cleans below the gum line to prevent and even reverse gum disease. Additionally, 3D technology has been clinically proven to whiten teeth better than "sonic" technology.

"Oral-B has been and still is at the forefront of dental technology and the Cochrane study confirms decades of our own research and development," said Bruce Cleverly, President, Gillette Oral Care. "We've always known, and the Cochrane study confirms our 3D Excel power toothbrush technology is the best at reducing plaque and gingivitis."

Power toothbrushes included in the Cochrane Collaboration study included brushes produced by Braun Oral-B, Philips Sonicare, Interplak, Rowenta and Ultrasonex. Detailed findings are to be published in the January 2003 issue of The Cochrane Library.
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About Gillette Oral Care
The $5 billion worldwide physical oral care market consists of both manual and power toothbrushes. With its Oral-B products, The Gillette Company is the worldwide leader in both segments. The brand includes manual and power toothbrushes for children and adults, oral irrigators and oral care centers and interdental products such as dental floss. Oral-B manual toothbrushes, the foundation and largest category of The Gillette Company's thriving oral care business, are used by more dentists and consumers than any other brand in the U.S. and many international markets.

Headquartered in Boston, The Gillette Company is the world leader in male grooming, a category that includes blades, razors and shaving preparations. Gillette also holds the number one position worldwide in selected female grooming products, such as wet shaving products and hair epilation devices. In addition, the Company is the world leader in alkaline batteries.

Porter Novelli

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