Nav: Home

Antidepressant use increases hip fracture risk among elderly

January 11, 2017

Antidepressant use nearly doubles the risk of hip fracture among community-dwelling persons with Alzheimer's disease, according to a new study from the University of Eastern Finland. The increased risk was highest at the beginning of antidepressant use and remained elevated even 4 years later. The findings were published in the International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry.

For each person with Alzheimer's disease, two controls without the disease were matched by age and sex. Antidepressant use was associated with two times higher risk of hip fracture among controls. However, the relative number of hip fractures was higher among persons with Alzheimer's disease compared to controls.

The increased risk was associated with all of the most frequently used antidepressant groups, which were selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI drugs), mirtazapine and selective noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors (SNRI drugs). The association between antidepressant use and the increased risk of hip fracture persisted even after adjusting the results for use of other medication increasing the risk of fall, osteoporosis, socioeconomic status, history of psychiatric diseases, and chronic diseases increasing the risk of fall or fracture.

Antidepressants are used not only for the treatment of depression, but also for the treatment of chronic pain and behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia, including insomnia, anxiety and agitation. If antidepressant use is necessary, researchers recommend that the medication and its necessity be monitored regularly. In addition, other risk factors for falling should be carefully considered during the antidepressant treatment.

The study was based on the register-based MEDALZ cohort comprising data on all community-dwelling persons diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease in Finland between 2005-2011, and their matched controls. The study population included 50,491 persons with and 100,982 persons without the disease. The follow-up was 4 years from the date of Alzheimer's disease diagnosis or a corresponding date for controls. The mean age of the study population was 80 years.
-end-
Further information: Sanna Torvinen-Kiiskinen, PhD student, School of Pharmacy, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio, +358 40 5021447, sanna.torvinen-kiiskinen@uef.fi

Original publication: Antidepressant use and risk of hip fractures among community-dwelling persons with and without Alzheimer's disease. Sanna Torvinen-Kiiskinen, Anna-Maija Tolppanen, Marjaana Koponen, Antti Tanskanen, Jari Tiihonen, Sirpa Hartikainen, Heidi Taipale. International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, 2017 Jan 5. doi: 10.1002/gps.4667. [Epub ahead of print]

University of Eastern Finland

Related Antidepressant Articles:

Decades-old antidepressant may fend off prostate cancer's return
An antidepressant from the '50s, repurposed to fight prostate cancer, lowered PSA levels in men with recurrent disease, pilot study shows.
Researchers say extended antidepressant use creates physical dependence
Researchers explain symptoms associated with Antidepressant Discontinuation Syndrome and provide a schedule for tapering various classes of antidepressants.
Number of depressed over-65s unchanged but antidepressant use soars
The proportion of people aged over 65 on antidepressants has more than doubled in two decades -- according to new research led by the University of East Anglia.
Antidepressant medications appear to be generally safe
Antidepressants are generally safe, according to a new study by an international team of researchers.
Why is ketamine an antidepressant?
Delving deep inside the neural circuitry of 'depressed' mice, researchers have revealed how ketamine works in cells to achieve its fast-acting antidepressant effect.
Childhood methylphenidate treatment predicts antidepressant use during adolescence
A new, 12-year longitudinal study, which monitored 6,830 children from early childhood into adolescence, has shown that consistent treatment with MPH-based medications during childhood increases the risk of antidepressant use during adolescence.
Antidepressant could stop deadly sepsis, study suggests
An antidepressant drug used to treat obsessive-compulsive disorder could save people from deadly sepsis, new research suggests.
Overprescribing of antidepressant medications may be common in elderly patients
In a Pharmacology Research & Perspectives study of individuals living in Olmsted County, Minnesota from 2005-2012, potential overprescribing of antidepressant medications occurred in nearly one-quarter of elderly residents.
Aerobic exercise has antidepressant treatment effects
An analysis of randomized controlled clinical trials indicates that supervised aerobic exercise has large antidepressant treatment effects for patients with major depression.
Antidepressant may help combat the course of multiple sclerosis
The antidepressant clomipramine may also alleviate symptoms of multiple sclerosis, specifically in its progressive form, i.e. when it occurs without relapses or remissions.
More Antidepressant News and Antidepressant Current Events

Trending Science News

Current Coronavirus (COVID-19) News

Top Science Podcasts

We have hand picked the top science podcasts of 2020.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Listen Again: Reinvention
Change is hard, but it's also an opportunity to discover and reimagine what you thought you knew. From our economy, to music, to even ourselves–this hour TED speakers explore the power of reinvention. Guests include OK Go lead singer Damian Kulash Jr., former college gymnastics coach Valorie Kondos Field, Stockton Mayor Michael Tubbs, and entrepreneur Nick Hanauer.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#562 Superbug to Bedside
By now we're all good and scared about antibiotic resistance, one of the many things coming to get us all. But there's good news, sort of. News antibiotics are coming out! How do they get tested? What does that kind of a trial look like and how does it happen? Host Bethany Brookeshire talks with Matt McCarthy, author of "Superbugs: The Race to Stop an Epidemic", about the ins and outs of testing a new antibiotic in the hospital.
Now Playing: Radiolab

Speedy Beet
There are few musical moments more well-worn than the first four notes of Beethoven's Fifth Symphony. But in this short, we find out that Beethoven might have made a last-ditch effort to keep his music from ever feeling familiar, to keep pushing his listeners to a kind of psychological limit. Big thanks to our Brooklyn Philharmonic musicians: Deborah Buck and Suzy Perelman on violin, Arash Amini on cello, and Ah Ling Neu on viola. And check out The First Four Notes, Matthew Guerrieri's book on Beethoven's Fifth. Support Radiolab today at Radiolab.org/donate.