Nav: Home

Don't let skiing and snowboarding injuries take you downhill

January 12, 2018

ROSEMONT, Ill. (Jan. 12, 2018)--Skiing and snowboarding are fun winter sports. As the popularity of these winter sports continue to rise, according to a review article published in the January 1, 2018, issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, the number of skier and snowboarder injuries also continues to rise.

"Skiing and snowboarding are associated with a large number of injuries, with specific patterns and anatomic areas affected," says Brett D. Owens, MD, lead review article author, an orthopaedic surgeon who specializes in sports medicine as well as complex shoulder and knee surgeries and who is a professor of orthopaedic surgery at the Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University.

The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) estimates that more than 140,000 people were treated in hospitals, doctors' offices, and emergency rooms in 2015 for skiing and snowboarding-related injuries (88,210 and 61,668 injuries, respectively). According to the review article:
  • Snowboarders were three times more likely than skiers to sustain injury.
  • In 1989, snowboarding injuries accounted for four percent of all snow sport-related injuries. By 1999, it made up to 56 percent of all snow sport-related injuries.
"While some injuries are unavoidable, many are caused by skiers and snowboarders exceeding their comfort zone in either speed or technical challenges on the mountain. It is critical to stay in control and be prepared to slow and stop to avoid contact with another person on the slope," says Dr. Owens.

The most common skiing and snowboarding injuries are to the spine, pelvis, shoulder, wrist, hands, knees, and foot and ankle. Skiers are more likely to experience lower extremity injuries, especially to their knees, "due to the rotational forces on the knee despite effective binding releases." Snowboarders are more likely to experience upper extremity injuries "due to falls onto their hands."

"Snow sport athletes can best prepare for their sport with a general preseason conditioning program as well as familiarity and maintenance of equipment," says Dr. Owens, who offers the following injury prevention tips:
  • Be prepared for the season with well-conditioned muscles and a body that is adequately hydrated.
  • Be knowledgeable about how to use your equipment appropriately, and ensure everything is in optimal working condition.
  • Check that the ski bindings can release from your boots when appropriate, and that boots fit appropriately.
  • Check that the edges of your skis and/or snowboard are flat and sharp for maximum performance to minimize injuries.
  • Always wear a helmet.
  • Avoid alcohol or drug use.
  • Be sure you have the ability to slow down and stop on busy days when many other athletes also are on the mountain.
  • Use extreme caution when weather conditions are not optimal.
  • Always follow signs and ski patrol instructions. Never ski or snowboard "out-of-bounds."
-end-
More information about the AAOS and JAAOS
Follow the AAOS on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram
Follow the conversation about JAAOS on Twitter

Disclosures

From Lifespan and the Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Providence, RI.

Dr. Owens or an immediate family member serves as a paid consultant to CONMED, DePuy Synthes Mitek Sports Medicine, and the Musculoskeletal Transplant Foundation; has received research or institutional support from Histogenics; and serves as a board member, owner, officer, or committee member of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, the American Orthopaedic Association, the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine, and the Arthroscopy Association of North America. None of the following authors or any immediate family member has received anything of value from or has stock or stock options held in a commercial company or institution related directly or indirectly to the subject of this article: Dr. Nacca, Dr. Harris, and Dr. Feller.

J Am Acad Orthop Surg 2018;0:1-10. DOI: 10.5435/JAAOS-D-16-00832

American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons

Related Athletes Articles:

Sleep disturbances predict substance use among college athletes
Preliminary results of a new study show that sleep disturbance is strongly related to the use of alcohol, tobacco, and illicit drugs among student athletes in college.
Study looks at the prevalence, challenges of athletes with ADHD
It's estimated there are more than six million children in the United States with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).
Athletes' symptom anxiety linked to risk of injury
The anxiety experienced by elite athletes over illness symptoms is linked to the risk of being injured during competition and should be taken seriously, according to a study carried out at the IAAF World Championships in Athletics 2015 and led by researchers at Linköping University, Sweden.
Student-athletes not sleeping enough, intervention could help
Survey results suggest that more than 40 percent of college athletes aren't getting the amount of sleep recommended for healthy adults.
New research on the muscles of elite athletes: When quality is better than quantity
A Danish-Swedish research team working on a project led by University of Southern Denmark has discovered that muscle endurance is not only determined by the number of mitochondria, but also their structure.
Detecting a new doping trend among Olympic athletes
Olympics officials already contending with the illegal use of steroids among athletes are now being proactive about a potential new trend in performance enhancement: gene doping.
Robot therapist hits the spot with athletes
Trials of a prototype robot for sports therapy have just begun in Singapore, to create a high quality and repeatable treatment routine to improve sports recovery, reducing reliance on trained therapists.
Athletes with concussion maintain improvements after use of mirroring neurotechnology
Brain State Technologies announces that a series of young athletes with long-term symptoms after concussion showed a variety of lasting improvements, after using HIRREM® neurotechnology.
Athletes may have white matter brain changes 6 months after a concussion
New research finds white matter changes in the brains of athletes six months after a concussion.
Rio athletes may benefit from 'leaky gut' therapy
'Leaky gut' is a condition where the thin mucosal barrier of the gut, which plays a role in absorbing nutrients and preventing large molecules and germs from the gut entering the blood stream, becomes less effective.

Related Athletes Reading:

The Brave Athlete: Calm the F*ck Down and Rise to the Occasion
by Simon Marshall PhD (Author), Lesley Paterson (Author)

The Mindful Athlete: Secrets to Pure Performance
by George Mumford (Author)

Rising Above: How 11 Athletes Overcame Challenges in Their Youth to Become Stars
by Gregory Zuckerman (Author), Elijah Zuckerman (Author), Gabriel Zuckerman (Author)

Bring Your "A" Game: A Young Athlete's Guide to Mental Toughness
by Jennifer L. Etnier (Author)

The No Meat Athlete Cookbook: Whole Food, Plant-Based Recipes to Fuel Your Workouts―and the Rest of Your Life
by Matt Frazier (Author), Stepfanie Romine (Author), Rich Roll (Author), Matt Frazier (Primary Contributor)

Mind Gym: An Athlete's Guide to Inner Excellence
by McGraw-Hill Education

Kid Athletes: True Tales of Childhood from Sports Legends (Kid Legends)
by David Stabler (Author), Doogie Horner (Illustrator)

A Still Quiet Place for Athletes: Mindfulness Skills for Achieving Peak Performance and Finding Flow in Sports and Life
by Amy Saltzman MD (Author), Jim Thompson (Foreword)

Complete Athlete: Women's Soccer
by Mia Hamm (Author), Don Yaeger (Author), Ziad Khoury (Author), Walid Khoury (Contributor)

No Meat Athlete, Revised and Expanded: A Plant-Based Nutrition and Training Guide for Every Fitness Level—Beginner to Beyond [Includes More Than 60 Recipes!]
by Matt Frazier (Author), Matt Ruscigno (Author), Brendan Brazier (Foreword)

Best Science Podcasts 2018

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2018. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Circular
We're told if the economy is growing, and if we keep producing, that's a good thing. But at what cost? This hour, TED speakers explore circular systems that regenerate and re-use what we already have. Guests include economist Kate Raworth, environmental activist Tristram Stuart, landscape architect Kate Orff, entrepreneur David Katz, and graphic designer Jessi Arrington.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#503 Postpartum Blues (Rebroadcast)
When a woman gives birth, it seems like everyone wants to know how the baby is doing. What does it weigh? Is it breathing right? Did it cry? But it turns out that, in the United States, we're not doing to great at asking how the mom, who just pushed something the size of a pot roast out of something the size of a Cheerio, is doing. This week we talk to anthropologist Kate Clancy about her postpartum experience and how it is becoming distressingly common, and we speak with Julie Wiebe about prolapse, what it is and how it's...