Hip fracture incidence expected to increase two-to-three fold in some Eurasian countries

January 12, 2021

A detailed analysis of the burden of osteoporosis in eight Eurasian countries has found that osteoporosis is a significant and growing health problem in the region that will escalate in the future due to expected demographic changes.

The authors of the Audit report [1] carried out a review of the available literature and a survey of the representatives of the national osteoporosis societies in eight Eurasian countries. The Audit reviews both the burden and the differences between Armenia, Belarus, Georgia, Moldova, Kazakhstan, the Kyrgyz Republic, the Russian Federation, and Uzbekistan with regard to the prevalence of osteoporosis and incidence of osteoporotic fractures, future demographic changes, diagnostic resources, and treatment availability.

The findings reveal: Professor Olga Lesnyak, lead author of the Audit, stated:

"We were pleased to see that in the 10 years since the previous International Osteoporosis Foundation (IOF) Audit2, some progress has been made in the region. However, the Audit clearly shows that there are enormous gaps and a great need for improvement in the fight against osteoporosis and related fractures, particularly in the face of expected demographic changes. We have identified an unacceptable absence of organized, specialized trauma care for hip fracture patients and continued poor accessibility to diagnosis, preventive treatments and post-fracture care in most countries of region."

IOF CEO, Dr Philippe Halbout added:

"With the expected demographic changes in the Eurasian region there will be a significant increase in the number of people with osteoporosis. To stem the tide of disability and loss of independence due to fragility fractures, urgent action is needed now at the national level in each country. This must begin with the recognition of osteoporosis as a priority health issue. We very much hope that this Audit will provide valuable insights and recommendations for health policy advances that will lead to fewer fractures and better patient outcomes in the region."

The authors and the national osteoporosis societies which contributed to the regional Audit have been commended by Professor Jean-Yves Reginster, Chair of the IOF Committee of National Societies (CNS):

"IOF is honoured to count 14 societies from the Eurasian region in its network of 260 member organizations from across the world. We congratulate the member societies and lead authors on this important initiative which highlights the burden of osteoporosis and identifies the key areas that must be addressed now and in the future."
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Further reading:

1. Lesnyak, O., Bilezikian, J.P., Zakroyeva, A. et al. Report on the Audit on Burden of Osteoporosis in Eight Countries of the Eurasian Region: Armenia, Belarus, Georgia, Moldova, Kazakhstan, the Kyrgyz Republic, the Russian Federation, and Uzbekistan. Arch Osteoporos 15, 175 (2020).
https://doi.org/10.1007/s11657-020-00836-y

Audit on Burden of Osteoporosis in Eight Countries of the EurAsian Region (Russian language)
https://www.osteoporosis.foundation/sites/iofbonehealth/files/2020-09/Audit_Osteop_Eurasia_2020.pdf

2. IOF Eastern European and Central Asian Regional Audit: Epidemiology, Costs and Burden of Osteoporosis (2010)
https://www.osteoporosis.foundation/sites/iofbonehealth/files/2019-06/2010_Eastern_European_Central_Asian_Audit_English.pdf

3. IOF regional audits for Asia-Pacific, Europe, Latin America, Middle-East and Africa
https://www.osteoporosis.foundation/educational-hub/material/audits

About IOF:

The International Osteoporosis Foundation (IOF) is the world's largest nongovernmental organization dedicated to the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of osteoporosis and related musculoskeletal diseases. IOF members, including committees of scientific researchers as well as 266 patient, medical and research societies, work together to make fracture prevention and healthy mobility a worldwide health care priority.
https://www.osteoporosis.foundation @iofbonehealth

International Osteoporosis Foundation

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