Rate of neonatal abstinence syndrome, maternal opioid-related diagnoses in US

January 12, 2021

What The Study Did:
Variations and changes in national and state rates of neonatal abstinence syndrome and maternal opioid-related diagnoses were examined in this observational study.

Authors:
Ashley H. Hirai, Ph.D., of the Health Resources and Services Administration in Rockville, Maryland, is the corresponding author.

To access the embargoed study:
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(doi:10.1001/jama.2020.24991)

Editor's Note: The article includes conflicts of interest and funding/support disclosures. Please see the article for additional information, including other authors, author contributions and affiliations, conflict of interest and financial disclosures, and funding and support.
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