Nav: Home

Your cell phone could curb the intensity of your workout

January 13, 2017

Want to get every perk possible from your power walk? Turn off your cell phone, advises Michael Rebold, Ph.D., assistant professor of integrative exercise science at Hiram College. In two recent studies published by Computers in Human Behavior and Performance Enhancement & Health, Rebold and researchers from Bloomsburg University of Pennsylvania revealed that talking or texting on a cell phone during exercise will lower the intensity of a workout and also affect balance.

The latest of these studies, The impact of different cell phone functions and their effects on postural stability, published Dec. 2, 2016, shows that cell phone texting and talking can have a negative effect on one's balance during everyday activities. This is the first known study to examine the effects of cell phone use on postural stability.

"If you're talking or texting on your cell phone while you're putting in your daily steps, your attention is divided by the two tasks and that can disrupt your postural stability, and therefore, possibly predispose individuals to other greater inherent risks such as falls and musculoskeletal injuries," Rebold says.

The study, which examined 45 college students, showed that cell phone texting during exercise significantly impacts postural stability - by 45 percent -- when compared to no cell phone use. The investigation also revealed that talking on a cell phone while exercising reduces postural stability by 19 percent. Listening to music on a cell phone, on the other hand, has no notable impact on postural stability during exercise, the study showed.

So next time you trot on the treadmill, go ahead - turn on the tunes.
-end-


Hiram College

Related Cell Phone Articles:

Cell phone use and distracted driving begins in the mind
Even simple cell phone conversations can cause distracted driving. Researchers have found listening on the phone while driving creates a lag in the mind to extract itself from one object before fixing attention on another object.
What motivates parents to protect children from cell phone addiction?
A new study examined the role parental mediation can play in protecting children from the potential negative effects of smartphone use, comparing the perceived risk and different types of mediation and parenting styles.
Catching the IMSI-catchers: SeaGlass brings transparency to cell phone surveillance
University of Washington security researchers have developed a new system called SeaGlass to detect anomalies in the cellular landscape that can indicate where and when IMSI-catchers, cell-site simulators and other devices used in cell phone surveillance are present.
Astronomers propose a cell phone search for galactic fast radio bursts
Fast radio bursts seem to come from distant galaxies, but there is no obvious reason that, every once in a while, an FRB wouldn't occur in our own Milky Way galaxy too.
Your cell phone could curb the intensity of your workout
Talking or texting on a cell phone during exercise will lower the intensity of a workout and also affect balance.
Cell phone conversations hinder child pedestrian crossing abilities -- Ben Gurion U. study
The study was conducted at the BGU Virtual Environment Simulation Laboratory, one of the world's most sophisticated traffic research facilities, which enables researchers to measure pedestrian reactions to virtual reality scenarios.
Counting molecules with an ordinary cell phone
The new visual readout method to count individual nucleic acid molecules within a sample can be performed by any cell-phone camera.
Phantom cell phone signals -- who hears them and why?
If you think you hear your cell phone ringing or feel it vibrating to signal an incoming call or message, but there actually is none, you may have 'ringxiety' and be psychologically primed to detect such signals.
UW researchers estimate poverty and wealth from cell phone metadata
University of Washington researchers have devised a way to estimate the distribution of wealth and poverty in an area by studying metadata from calls and texts made on cell phones.
A fast cell sorter shrinks to cell phone size
Commercially available cell sorters can rapidly and accurately aid medical diagnosis and biological research, but they are large and expensive, present a biohazard and may damage cells.

Related Cell Phone Reading:

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Climate Crisis
There's no greater threat to humanity than climate change. What can we do to stop the worst consequences? This hour, TED speakers explore how we can save our planet and whether we can do it in time. Guests include climate activist Greta Thunberg, chemical engineer Jennifer Wilcox, research scientist Sean Davis, food innovator Bruce Friedrich, and psychologist Per Espen Stoknes.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#527 Honey I CRISPR'd the Kids
This week we're coming to you from Awesome Con in Washington, D.C. There, host Bethany Brookshire led a panel of three amazing guests to talk about the promise and perils of CRISPR, and what happens now that CRISPR babies have (maybe?) been born. Featuring science writer Tina Saey, molecular biologist Anne Simon, and bioethicist Alan Regenberg. A Nobel Prize winner argues banning CRISPR babies won’t work Geneticists push for a 5-year global ban on gene-edited babies A CRISPR spin-off causes unintended typos in DNA News of the first gene-edited babies ignited a firestorm The researcher who created CRISPR twins defends...