Nav: Home

MED-EL convenes global hearing researchers for age-related hearing loss workshop

January 13, 2017

Jan. 12, 2017 - (New York, NY) - More than 100 leading scientists and hearing health experts from around the world will gather starting today for a two-day scientific workshop sponsored by global hearing implant leader MED-EL. The multidisciplinary meeting will include ENT surgeons who specialize in older adults, research audiologists and rehabilitation therapists from the world's top universities and research centers. During the scientific exchange, attendees will discuss ongoing research and identify needs of candidates and users with the ultimate goal of improving the lives of older adults who live with hearing loss.

The World Health Organization estimates that 164.5 million people over the age of 65 (or one third of the 65+ population) live with disabling hearing loss.

"Hearing loss is a hidden disability that affects a growing number of older adults, many of whom leave their hearing loss untreated," said Ingeborg Hochmair, CEO and founder of MED-EL. "MED-EL employees around the world strive every day to advance technology that will help overcome hearing loss as a barrier to communication. We foster training, education and research so that professionals are even more effective in treating older adults with hearing loss. This workshop is a wonderful opportunity for professionals from many fields to engage with each other and share their findings on age-related hearing loss."

"Conditions of aging that have been associated with hearing loss -- such as dementia, social isolation, depression and an increased risk of falls - have devastating physical, emotional and financial consequences to individuals and society as a whole," said Barbara E. Weinstein, PhD, professor and Founding Executive Officer, CUNY Graduate School and University Center, and expert in the field of geriatric audiology. "Helping to restore hearing, communication, social participation and the promise of once again living an engaged life, can have far-reaching effects for the quality of life of older adults living with hearing loss."

Worldwide, the population is aging at an unprecedented rate and life expectancies are higher than ever before. Increased attention is being paid to the urgent need to facilitate independence among older adults for as long as possible -- from a personal, community and public health standpoint. Recent scientific discoveries surrounding the connections between hearing loss and mental and physical health are compelling. The promise of restoring hearing and giving life back to years of older adults is an exciting and multi-faceted research topic.

The MED-EL workshop will include topics on cognition and age-related hearing loss, outcomes in older adults with hearing implants, neurobiology, neuroplasticity, clinical aspects, anesthesiology and surgery, and rehabilitation.

"We're proud to support this meeting, which offers experts the opportunity to share their research on the topic of age-related hearing loss. MED-EL is celebrating 20 years of helping people with hearing loss in the US, and meetings like this will advance our field and prepare us for the next 20 years and beyond," said Raymond Gamble, President and CEO of MED-EL North America.
-end-
About MED-EL

Austria-based MED-EL Medical Electronics is a leading provider of hearing implant systems with 29 subsidiaries worldwide. The family-owned business is one of the pioneers in the industry. The two Austrian scientists Ingeborg and Erwin Hochmair developed the world's first microelectronic-multichannel cochlear implant, now considered the modern cochlear implant, which was implanted in 1977. The cochlear implant was and remains the first replacement of a human sense, the sense of hearing. In 1990 the Hochmairs laid the foundation for the successful growth of the company when they hired their first employees. To date, the company has grown to more than 1,700 employees around the world.

MED-EL offers the widest range of implantable solutions worldwide to treat various degrees of hearing loss, including cochlear and middle ear implant systems, and the EAS (combined Electric Acoustic Stimulation) hearing implant system. In July 2016, MED-EL acquired the technology for a novel non-surgical bone conduction system from the Swedish medical device company Otorix, further expanding the number of people who can benefit from innovative hearing technology and reinforcing MED-EL's mission to overcome hearing loss as a barrier to communication. People in over 100 countries enjoy the gift of hearing with the help of a product from MED-EL. http://www.medel.com

MED-EL Corporation

Related Aging Articles:

The first roadmap for ovarian aging
Infertility likely stems from age-related decline of the ovaries, but the molecular mechanisms that lead to this decline have been unclear.
Researchers discover new cause of cell aging
New research from the USC Viterbi School of Engineering could be key to our understanding of how the aging process works.
Deep Aging Clocks: The emergence of AI-based biomarkers of aging and longevity
The advent of deep biomarkers of aging, longevity and mortality presents a range of non-obvious applications.
Intelligence can link to health and aging
For over 100 years, scientists have sought to understand what links a person's general intelligence, health and aging.
Putting the brakes on aging
Salk Institute researchers have developed a new gene therapy to help decelerate the aging process.
New insights into the aging brain
A group of scientists at the Gladstone Institutes investigated why the choroid plexus contains so much more klotho than other brain regions.
We all want 'healthy aging,' but what is it, really? New report looks for answers
Led by Paul Mulhausen, MD, MHS, FACP, AGSF, colleagues from the American Geriatrics Society (AGS) set looking critically at what 'healthy aging' really means.
New insight into aging
Researchers at the Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital (The Neuro) of McGill University examined the effects of aging on neuroplasticity in the primary auditory cortex, the part of the brain that processes auditory information.
Aging may be as old as life itself
Aging has had a bad rap since it has long been considered a consequence of biology's concentrated effort on enhancing survival through reproductivity.
A new link between cancer and aging
Human lung cancer cells resist dying by controlling parts of the aging process, according to findings published online May 10th in the Journal of Biological Chemistry.
More Aging News and Aging Current Events

Trending Science News

Current Coronavirus (COVID-19) News

Top Science Podcasts

We have hand picked the top science podcasts of 2020.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Listen Again: Reinvention
Change is hard, but it's also an opportunity to discover and reimagine what you thought you knew. From our economy, to music, to even ourselves–this hour TED speakers explore the power of reinvention. Guests include OK Go lead singer Damian Kulash Jr., former college gymnastics coach Valorie Kondos Field, Stockton Mayor Michael Tubbs, and entrepreneur Nick Hanauer.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#562 Superbug to Bedside
By now we're all good and scared about antibiotic resistance, one of the many things coming to get us all. But there's good news, sort of. News antibiotics are coming out! How do they get tested? What does that kind of a trial look like and how does it happen? Host Bethany Brookeshire talks with Matt McCarthy, author of "Superbugs: The Race to Stop an Epidemic", about the ins and outs of testing a new antibiotic in the hospital.
Now Playing: Radiolab

Dispatch 6: Strange Times
Covid has disrupted the most basic routines of our days and nights. But in the middle of a conversation about how to fight the virus, we find a place impervious to the stalled plans and frenetic demands of the outside world. It's a very different kind of front line, where urgent work means moving slow, and time is marked out in tiny pre-planned steps. Then, on a walk through the woods, we consider how the tempo of our lives affects our minds and discover how the beats of biology shape our bodies. This episode was produced with help from Molly Webster and Tracie Hunte. Support Radiolab today at Radiolab.org/donate.