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Why did we give sailors and soldiers shark repellent that ... didn't work? (video)

January 13, 2020

WASHINGTON, Jan. 13, 2020 -- People have been developing different forms of shark repellent for decades -- the military even issued a chemical shark repellent called "Shark Chaser" to pilots, sailors and astronauts(!) from the end of World War II through the start of the Vietnam War. Thing is ... it didn't really work. Learn why they bothered passing it out or even created it in the first place: https://youtu.be/4u54c7cRAog.
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