Researchers reveal high performance CNT catalyst relating to its electroconductivity

January 14, 2018

Recent research published in a report in NANO showed biofuels were obtained from Jatropha Oil using carbon nanotube (CNT) catalyst, which showed efficient cracking activity. The performance was activated by the high stability, metal sites, acid sites, electroconductivity, and coking tolerance of CNT. Two cracking circulations were found in the hydroprocessing. The sulphur-free process was also eco-friendly.

Hydroprocessing of vegetable oil is widely used to produce biodiesel. The catalyst is very significant for the performance of the process. As an electric charge carrier, the researchers found that the velocity of electron reaches the speed of light 1/ 300 in graphene, far more than the normal conductor. Carbon nanotubes (CNT) are constructed of rolled up graphene sheets with one dimensional extended π conjugated structures.

A team of researchers from the Beihang University in China, Beijing has demonstrated that CNT catalysts showed efficient cracking activity. The electroconductivity of the CNT support was especially beneficial for the improvement of catalyst activity. The nickel (Ni) and phosphotungstic acid (HPW) supported on CNT were prepared by the team as catalyst for hydroprocessing of Jatropha oil. Their report appears in the December issue of the journal NANO.

The alkanes yield of C15-C18 was 88.5 wt%, Iso/n ratio was 0.8 and conversion was 97.7% at 320 °C, 3.0 MPa and 1.0/h over the Ni-HPW(40)/CNT catalyst, while the yield of < C15 alkanes reached 51.9 wt% at 400 °C. The distribution of products could be adjusted by reaction temperature. The activity of metal sites was affected by the transformation of oxidation/ reduction of Ni species, which required high electroconductivity of the support. The activity of acids sites was also closely related to the electroconductivity of the support. Thus, the cracking performance was elevated by the addition of Ni or HPW and the electroconductivity of the support. The cracking activity was enhanced by the increased acidity of the catalyst, which resulted in more carbenium ions formed, and the carbenium ion stimulated the isomerization reaction. The transfer of hydrogen electron was accelerated by the electroconductivity of the catalyst, which enhanced the cracking activity of the catalyst, and the results coincided with the formation mechanism of catalyst acidity. The formation of carbenium ion promoted the β-elimination process, which then launched the two circulations for further cracking. The ability of coking tolerance may be related to the morphology of the catalyst and the repulsive force between carbon atoms. Meanwhile, the catalyst was used without sulfurization and the cracking process was green. "This catalyst can be regarded as an attractive candidate for cracking conversion of vegetable oils due to its high performance and clean properties " according to Xiaosong Yang, the senior author of the paper. The Beihang University team is currently exploring catalysts with high performances.
-end-
For more insight into the research described, readers are invited to access the paper on NANO.

NANO is an international peer-reviewed monthly journal for nanoscience and nanotechnology that presents forefront fundamental research and new emerging topics. It features timely scientific reports of new results and technical breakthroughs and publishes interesting review articles about recent hot issues.

About World Scientific Publishing Co.

World Scientific Publishing is a leading independent publisher of books and journals for the scholarly, research, professional and educational communities. The company publishes about 600 books annually and about 130 journals in various fields. World Scientific collaborates with prestigious organizations like the Nobel Foundation and US National Academies Press to bring high quality academic and professional content to researchers and academics worldwide. To find out more about World Scientific, please visit http://www.worldscientific.com.

For more information, contact Judy Yeo at jlyeo@wspc.com.

World Scientific

Related Carbon Nanotube Articles from Brightsurf:

Scientists grow carbon nanotube forest much longer than any other
Carbon nanotube (CNT) forests are a solution to scaling up the production of CNTs, which are becoming a staple in many industries.

Neurons in spinal-cord injuries are reconnected in vivo via carbon nanotube sponges
Research conducted by two groups at the Center for Cooperative Research in Biomaterials CIC biomaGUNE and one at SISSA, Scuola Internazionale Superiore di Studi Avanzati (Italy), showed that functional materials based on carbon nanotubes offer a possible means for facilitating the reconnecting of neuronal networks damaged as a result of spinal cord injuries.

No limit yet for carbon nanotube fibers
Rice University researchers report advances in their quest to make the best carbon nanotube fibers for industry.

Electrochemical doping: researchers improve carbon nanotube transparent conductors
Skoltech researchers and their colleagues from Aalto University have discovered that electrochemical doping with ionic liquid can significantly enhance the optical and electrical properties of transparent conductors made of single-walled carbon nanotube films.

No touching: Skoltech researchers find contactless way to measure thickness of carbon nanotube films
Scientists from Skoltech and their colleagues from Russia and Finland have figured out a non-invasive way to measure the thickness of single-walled carbon nanotube films, which may find applications in a wide variety of fields from solar energy to smart textiles.

Carbon nanotube transistors make the leap from lab to factory floor
A technique for making carbon nanotube transistors in large quantities paves the way for more energy efficient, 3D microprocessors.

New study presents hygroscopic micro/nanolenses along carbon nanotube ion channels
A recent study, affiliated with South Korea's Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST) has introduced a novel technology, which allows carbon nanotubes (CNTs) to be easily observed under room temperature.

Improving the electrical and mechanical properties of carbon-nanotube-based fibers
University of Illinois researchers at the Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology recently developed a technique that can be used to build carbon-nanotube-based fibers by creating chemical crosslinks.

Graphene substrate improves the conductivity of carbon nanotube network
Scientists at Aalto University, Finland, and the University of Vienna, Austria, have combined graphene and single-walled carbon nanotubes into a transparent hybrid material with conductivity higher than either component exhibits separately.

Cooling nanotube resonators with electrons
In a study in Nature Physics, ICFO researchers report on a technique that uses electron transport to cool a nanomechanical resonator near the quantum regime.

Read More: Carbon Nanotube News and Carbon Nanotube Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.