Experts seek to standardize treatments for childhood rheumatic diseases

January 15, 2018

Pediatric rheumatic diseases are a varied group of rare diseases including juvenile forms of arthritis, lupus, fibromyalgia, and other conditions. Currently, there is considerable variability in how patients with these diseases are treated in clinical practice, making it difficult to understand which therapies work best. A new review article in Arthritis & Rheumatology examines recent efforts to address this challenge.

Ideally, randomized placebo-controlled clinical trials are conducted to help determine the best course of action against a disease, but such trials are difficult to perform in rare diseases. Consensus treatment plans (CTPs) are a potential alternative. CTPs are standardized strategies that are developed by a consensus among experts and are intended to help reduce treatment variability and allow for comparisons of different therapies. The Childhood Arthritis and Rheumatology Research Alliance (CARRA), the largest pediatric rheumatology research collaborative in North America, is pioneering the use of CTPs to standardize the common treatments for pediatric rheumatic diseases.

In their review, Sarah Ringold, MD, MS, of Seattle Children's Hospital, and her colleagues present the rationale for the CARRA CTP approach, consider its advantages and disadvantages, and introduce related ongoing research.

"Once a diagnosis is made, providers and patients and their families can choose together the CTP strategy that they believe will work the best for that disease," Dr. Ringold explained. "Information on how the patient is doing on that treatment is then collected at regular clinic visits through a registry. At the end of the proposed study duration, researchers can then compare how the patients do between the different CTPs."

Dr. Ringold noted that ongoing large-scale studies are testing this approach in juvenile idiopathic arthritis. Results from these studies will provide more information on the feasibility of this approach and may provide insights on which therapeutic strategies are most likely to be successful for certain patients. "The CTP approach will be even more powerful when coupled with biospecimen collection to facilitate translational research aimed at identifying biomarkers of response and non-response, paving the way towards personalized medicine," she said.
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Additional Information

Author Contact: Evan Koch, of Seattle Children's press office, at Evan.Koch@seattlechildrens.org.

About the Journal

Arthritis & Rheumatology is an official journal of the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) and covers all aspects of inflammatory disease. The American College of Rheumatology is the professional organization whose members share a dedication to healing, preventing disability, and curing the more than 100 types of arthritis and related disabling and sometimes fatal disorders of the joints, muscles, and bones. Members include practicing physicians, research scientists, nurses, physical and occupational therapists, psychologists, and social workers. The journal is published by Wiley on behalf of the ACR. For more information, please visit http://wileyonlinelibrary.com/journal/art.

About Wiley

Wiley, a global research and learning company, helps people and organizations develop the skills and knowledge they need to succeed. Our online scientific, technical, medical, and scholarly journals, combined with our digital learning, assessment and certification solutions help universities, learned societies, businesses, governments and individuals increase the academic and professional impact of their work. For more than 210 years, we have delivered consistent performance to our stakeholders. The company's website can be accessed at http://www.wiley.com.

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