Nav: Home

Targets and patented drugs for chemotherapy of Chagas disease

January 16, 2017

Chagas diseaseis a parasitic infection typically spread by triatomine vectors, affecting millions of people all over Latin America. Existing chemotherapy is centered on benznidazole and nifurtimox, providing unsatisfactory results and substantial side effects. The transmission of the disease by people migration has determined the emergence as a public health problem elsewhere in non-endemic countries of the word.So, the finding of novel ways to challenge this neglected disease is a main priority. Progress in scientific knowledge about Trypanosoma cruzi in the period comprising last 15-years has increased the identification of multiple targets for Chagas´ disease chemotherapy. Ergosterol biosynthesis pathway and cruzipain, the key cysteine protease (CP) of T.cruzi, considered as the best encouraging targets for trypanocidal drugs. Recent unfortunate clinical trials investigating the administration of pozoconazole and ravuconazole to chronic patients; an approach for the fast development of novel anti-T.cruzi chemotherapy focused on the CP inhibitor K777, which is close to entering the clinical trial phase. The combination of known drugs with existing trypanocidal agents and compounds recently identified as clinical candidates for Chagas disease can be considered among the finest points of the manuscript. In addition, trypanothione biosynthesis, thiol-dependant redox and polyamine metabolism, the glycolytic, glyconeogenic, pentose phosphate, lipidic and polyisoprenoid biosynthetic pathways, and specific enzymes from these biosynthetic pathways have been also specifically discussed. Novel synthesized anti-T. cruzi compounds with or without specific single or multi-target assigned have been also described in detail. In summary, loans on anti-Chagas disease agents focused to specific parasite targets as their metabolic pathways or specific enzymes have been summarized. Patent literature collected and published from 2000 to 2015, alleging inhibitors for specific T. cruzi targets or trypanocidal activity was achieved over the search database from Delphion Research intellectual property network including international patents and the European patent office, Espacenet.
-end-
For more information about the article, please visit https://benthamscience.com/journals/recent-patents-on-anti-infective-drug-discovery/volume/11/issue/2/page/74/Reference: Duschak, VG.; (2016). Targets and Patented Drugs for Chemotherapy of Chagas Disease in the Last 15 Years-Period. Recent Patents on Anticancer Drug Discovery, DOI: 10.2174/1574891X11666161024165304

Bentham Science Publishers

Related Chagas Disease Articles:

Alzheimer's drug also treats parasitic Chagas disease
The drugs currently used to treat Chagas disease, a neglected tropical disease, have serious side effects and limited use in those with chronic disease.
'Asexual' Chagas parasite found to sexually reproduce
The parasite that causes Chagas disease, which had largely been thought to be asexual, has been shown to reproduce sexually after scientists uncovered clues hidden in its genomic code.
Biocompound from Atlantic Rainforest combats leishmaniasis and Chagas disease
Researchers find that substances synthesized from plant species endemic to the biodiversity hotspot can kill the parasites that cause these neglected diseases.
Artificial intelligence identifies 'kissing bugs' that spread Chagas disease
A University of Kansas researcher publishes proof-of-concept research showing artificial intelligence can recognize 12 Mexican and 39 Brazilian species of kissing bugs with high accuracy by analyzing ordinary photos -- an advantage for officials looking to cut the spread of Chagas disease.
Shorter treatment for Chagas disease could be just as effective, and significantly safer
A two-week treatment course for adult patients with chronic Chagas disease showed, when compared to placebo, similar efficacy and significantly fewer side effects than the standard treatment duration of eight weeks, according to the results of a clinical trial in Bolivia led by the Drugs for Neglected Diseases initiative (DNDi).
Long-term prognosis of Chagas patients improved with anti-parasite drug
Researchers have found that the anti-parasite drug benznidazole may improve the long-term prognoses of patients with chronic Chagas disease, according to a study published in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases, by Clareci Silva Cardoso at the Federal University of São João del-Rei, Divinópolis, Brazil, and colleagues from the SaMi-Trop study, a project funded by NIAID/NIH.
Chagas disease, caused by a parasite, has spread outside of...
Chagas disease is caused by a parasite, transmitted by a blood-sucking insect -- Trypanosoma cruzi -- and less frequently, from mother to fetus or by contaminated food or drink.
Contact sports associated with Lewy body disease, Parkinson's disease symptoms, dementia
There is mounting evidence that repetitive head impacts from contact sports and other exposures are associated with the neurodegenerative disease chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) and dementia.
Study describes enzyme's key role in immune response to Chagas disease parasite
A study shows that the expression of PI3Kγ protein increases during infection by T. cruzi, an essential response in avoiding excessive inflammation and controlling parasitemia.
In kidney disease patients, illicit drug use linked with disease progression and death
Among individuals with chronic kidney disease, hard illicit drug use was associated with higher risks of kidney disease progression and early death.
More Chagas Disease News and Chagas Disease Current Events

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Rethinking Anger
Anger is universal and complex: it can be quiet, festering, justified, vengeful, and destructive. This hour, TED speakers explore the many sides of anger, why we need it, and who's allowed to feel it. Guests include psychologists Ryan Martin and Russell Kolts, writer Soraya Chemaly, former talk radio host Lisa Fritsch, and business professor Dan Moshavi.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#538 Nobels and Astrophysics
This week we start with this year's physics Nobel Prize awarded to Jim Peebles, Michel Mayor, and Didier Queloz and finish with a discussion of the Nobel Prizes as a way to award and highlight important science. Are they still relevant? When science breakthroughs are built on the backs of hundreds -- and sometimes thousands -- of people's hard work, how do you pick just three to highlight? Join host Rachelle Saunders and astrophysicist, author, and science communicator Ethan Siegel for their chat about astrophysics and Nobel Prizes.