An alternative therapy against brucellosis

January 17, 2006

This press release is also available in Spanish.

Concepción Lecároz, a researcher from the University of Navarra, has developed a new therapy against brucellosis. This zoonosis --a disease or infection of animals which can be transmitted to humans under natural conditions-- annually affects 500,000 people worldwide. This research project forms part of her doctoral thesis, defended at the University's School of Pharmacy.

This study has permitted the development of a new treatment which significantly reduces infections in mice, as opposed to the traditional treatment with "free" (unencapsulated) antibiotics with short treatment times. Despite the fact that brucellosis is highly susceptible to the majority of antibiotics, the indices of relapse in humans ranges from 5 to 15% depending on the antibiotic regimen; in any case, standard treatment requires combined therapy during long periods of time.

The alternative treatment developed by Ms. Lecároz involves the transportation of the antibiotic gentamicina to infected cells by means of biodegradable particles, which can produce a much higher concentration of antibiotic precisely in the organs which are infected. These biodegradable systems are designed in such a way that they release the antibiotic in a controlled manner, which allows therapeutic levels of antibiotics after a reduced number of dosages.

The next step: human trials

In this research project, Concepción Lecároz has achieved a significant reduction of spleen pathogens in mice, which has led to the possibility of achieving similar results in humans.

In Spain, along with tuberculosis and meningococcal meningitis, brucellosis is one of the most frequent endemic bacterial pathologies. The characteristic symptoms of the disease are fever, chills, weakness, muscular pain, sweating and headaches. If the bacteria invades the bloodstream, it can infect numerous tissues and organs, such as the liver, the spleen, the bones, the genitourinary system, the lungs, the central nervous system, and the heart, to the point of even endangering the life of the patient.
-end-


Elhuyar Fundazioa

Related Antibiotics Articles from Brightsurf:

Insights in the search for new antibiotics
A collaborative research team from the University of Oklahoma, the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center and Merck & Co. published an opinion article in the journal, Nature Chemical Biology, that addresses the gap in the discovery of new antibiotics.

New tricks for old antibiotics
The study published in the journal Immunity reveals that tetracyclines (broad spectre antibiotics), by partially inhibiting cell mitochondria activity, induce a compensatory response on the organism that decreases tissue damage caused during infection.

Benefits, risks seen with antibiotics-first for appendicitis
Antibiotics are a good choice for some patients with appendicitis but not all, according to study results published today in the New England Journal of Medicine.

How antibiotics interact
Understanding bottleneck effects in the translation of bacterial proteins can lead to a more effective combination of antibiotics / study in 'Nature Communications'

Are antivitamins the new antibiotics?
Antibiotics are among the most important discoveries of modern medicine and have saved millions of lives since the discovery of penicillin almost 100 years ago.

Hygiene reduces the need for antibiotics by up to 30%
A new paper published in the American Journal of Infection Control (AJIC), finds improved everyday hygiene practices, such as hand-washing, reduces the risk of common infections by up to 50%, reducing the need for antibiotics, by up to 30%.

Antibiotics: City dwellers and children take the most
City dwellers take more antibiotics than people in rural areas; children and the elderly use them more often than middle-aged people; the use of antibiotics decreases as education increases, but only in rich countries: These are three of the more striking trends identified by researchers of the NRW Forschungskolleg ''One Health and Urban Transformation'' at the University of Bonn.

Metals could be the link to new antibiotics
Compounds containing metals could hold the key to the next generation of antibiotics to combat the growing threat of global antibiotic resistance.

Antibiotics from the sea
The team led by Prof. Christian Jogler of Friedrich Schiller University, Jena, has succeeded in cultivating several dozen marine bacteria in the laboratory -- bacteria that had previously been paid little attention.

Antibiotics not necessary for most toothaches, according to new ADA guideline
The American Dental Association (ADA) announced today a new guideline indicating that in most cases, antibiotics are not recommended for toothaches.

Read More: Antibiotics News and Antibiotics Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.