Nav: Home

New study validates clotting risk factors in chronic kidney disease

January 17, 2018

(Boston)--In late 2017, researchers from Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) discovered and published (Science Translational Medicine, (9) 417, Nov 2017) a potential treatment target to prevent chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients from developing thrombosis (blood clots) without causing bleeding complications. They found that boosting a regulatory protein named STUB1 decreased the abundance of tissue factor (TF) and prevented blood vessel blockages in experimental models.

Now, these same researchers have tested other aspect of this hypothesis in humans with promising results. Chronic kidney disease is associated with buildup of urea in the blood, and leads to accumulation of "uremic" solutes, which was thought to result in cardiovascular toxicity including thrombosis.

Led by BUSM senior author and senior co-author, Vipul Chitalia, MD, PhD, associate professor of medicine, and Katya Ravid, DSc, professor of medicine and biochemistry, an interdisciplinary team expanded their previous study using two independent human cohorts in which blood plasma was analyzed for uremic solutes that are tryptophan byproducts such as indoxyl sulfate (IS) and TF activity, among other tests. Tryptophan is an essential amino acid, meaning the body cannot synthesize it, and must be obtained from the diet.

Using cutting edge machine learning approaches, the researchers analyzed samples from 473 participants of the Dialysis Access Consortium Clopidogrel Prevention of Early AV Fistula Thrombosis trial with advanced CKD, as well as 377 baseline samples from participants in the Thrombolysis in Myocardial Infarction II trial, many of whom had CKD stage 2-3. "Both groups showed an association between blood clotting and the level of IS as well as TF activity. They also found another association between patients who had clots with higher levels of kynurenine, which is another uremic solute found in patients who developed blood clots in surgically created passageways between an artery and a vein, known as arteriovenous fistula," explained Chitalia. Overall, this work confirms the effects of uremic solutes in humans and shows that a set of uremic solutes strongly influences thrombosis in patients with different levels of kidney function.

"The translation of findings from experimental models to humans can be challenging. However, this human validation of tryptophan metabolites-TF axis supports further studies probing its utility in risk stratification of CKD patients and exploring its role in other diseases with heightened risk of thrombosis." said Ravid.
-end-
The study, with Vijaya B. Kolachalama, PhD, assistant professor of medicine, as first author and collaborators such as Anqi Zhang, PhD, instructor of medicine, Jean Francis, MD, assistant professor of medicine and Laura M. Dember, MD, professor of medicine, was published in the Journal of American Society of Nephrology (a top tier journal in the field of renal diseases) and supported by National Institute of Health grants to Chitalia and Ravid and by the Evans Center for Interdisciplinary Biomedical Research ARC on Thrombosis.

Boston University School of Medicine

Related Blood Clots Articles:

New ultrasound 'drill' targets deep vein blood clots
Researchers have developed a new surgical tool that uses low-frequency intravascular ultrasound to break down blood clots that cause deep vein thrombosis.
New blood thinner better at preventing recurrent blood clots than aspirin
An international research team with prominent Canadian leadership has found that the blood thinner rivaroxaban is as safe as aspirin, and more effective at preventing recurrence of life-threatening blood clots in the legs and lungs, according to a study being published in the New England Journal of Medicine and presented at the American College of Cardiology's 66th Annual Scientific Session.
Preventing blood clots with a new metric for heart function
Scientists from Johns Hopkins University and Ohio State University have discovered a new method for predicting those most at risk for thrombus, or blood clots, in the heart.
Statins could halt vein blood clots, research suggests
Statins could hold the key to eradicating one of the most preventable causes of hospital deaths after researchers uncovered a new role for the cholesterol-lowering pill.
Exploring why an anticoagulant might create blood clots
An oral anticoagulant drug given to some heart disease patients may actually enhance blood clot formation, according to a new study.
Increased risk of blood clots soon after starting testosterone treatment
Starting testosterone treatment is associated with an increased risk of serious blood clots (known as venous thromboembolism or VTE) that peaks within six months and declines gradually thereafter, concludes a study in The BMJ today.
New technology detects blood clots with simple in-home test
NSF-Funded UC research leads to a screening test for patients on blood thinners to reduce the risk for a blood clot or stroke that's as easy as an in-home diabetes test.
Link found between obesity and blood clots in pediatric patients
Researchers at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center have found an association between obesity and the formation of blood clots in the veins of children and adolescents.
Detecting when and why deadly blood clots form
Scientists at the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard University have devised a better assay for testing blood's clotting tendency, also known as hemostasis, which could one day prove lifesaving in a variety of clinical situations in which a patient's health is jeopardized by abnormal blood coagulation and platelet function.
Blood clots may complicate aortic valve replacements
Heart valve replacements made from tissue (bioprosthetic valves) have long been thought to be spared the complication of blood clot formation.

Related Blood Clots Reading:

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Setbacks
Failure can feel lonely and final. But can we learn from failure, even reframe it, to feel more like a temporary setback? This hour, TED speakers on changing a crushing defeat into a stepping stone. Guests include entrepreneur Leticia Gasca, psychology professor Alison Ledgerwood, astronomer Phil Plait, former professional athlete Charly Haversat, and UPS training manager Jon Bowers.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#524 The Human Network
What does a network of humans look like and how does it work? How does information spread? How do decisions and opinions spread? What gets distorted as it moves through the network and why? This week we dig into the ins and outs of human networks with Matthew Jackson, Professor of Economics at Stanford University and author of the book "The Human Network: How Your Social Position Determines Your Power, Beliefs, and Behaviours".