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Roberto Morandotti and Federico Rosei receive the Sichuan Province 1,000 talents award

January 18, 2017

The government of Sichuan province has recognized the outstanding research of two INRS professors, Roberto Morandotti and Federico Rosei, respectively for their work in photonics and nanotechnology, by attributing them the prestigious 1000 talents short term award of Sichuan province.

The award is also intended to foster collaborative work between the awardees and the Institute of Fundamental and Frontier Science at the University of Electronic Science and Technology of China in Chengdu, where Prof.s Morandotti and Rosei both have visiting appointments.

Prof. Morandotti will pursue research on emerging technologies in integrated optics. In particular, he will use micro resonating structures to perform analogical and quantum computing on a glass-based chip compatible with today's silicon electronics.

Prof. Rosei's collaboration will focus instead on developing novel materials for solar technologies. More specifically, he will work on synthesizing Quantum Dots (QDs) as sensitizers for both solar cells and photoelectrochemical hydrogen production devices.

Biographical notes


Prof. Morandotti joined INRS in 2003, where he is a Full Professor since 2008. His research interests mainly deal with the linear and nonlinear properties of periodic structures, both in III-V semiconductors and silica, as well as with optics at unusual wavelengths, including THz. Prof. Morandotti is author and coauthor of more than 700 papers in scientific journals and conferences (including ~15 contributions in Nature, Science, Nature Photonics, Nature Physics, Nature Communications, Light Science and Applications, and Science Advances, as well as ~35 in Physical Review Letters) and gave over 100 invited keynote and plenary talks in various international conferences. He is currently serving/has served as a subcommittee chair/technical committee member for several OSA, IEEE and SPIE meetings. Prof. Morandotti is an E.W.R. Steacie Memorial Fellow, a Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada, a Fellow of the Optical Society of America, a Fellow of the American Physical Society, a Fellow of the Institute of Physics and a Fellow of the SPIE, among others.

Professor Rosei joined INRS in May 2002 and has been the Director of the Centre for Energy, Materials and Telecommunications since July 2011. He holds the Canada Research Chair in Nanostructured Materials and the UNESCO Chair in Materials and Technologies for Energy Conversion, Saving and Storage. He has received numerous awards and distinctions for his work in nanotechnology, including Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada, of the American Physical Society, of the European Academy of Science, of the World Academy of Art and Science and the Canadian Academy of Engineering; as well as the Chang Jiang Scholar Award (Government of China), the Khwarizmi International Award (Government of Iran), the Selby Fellowship (Australian Academy of Science), the Vasconcelos Award (World Cultural Council) and the FW Bessel Award (von Humboldt Foundation).
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Institut national de la recherche scientifique - INRS

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