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Nerve growth factor: Early studies and recent clinical trials

January 18, 2019

Nerve growth factor has been playing an important role in development of adult neurobiology. This is because of the regulatory functions that it possesses on survival, growth and differentiation of nerve cells in both of the central and peripheral nervous systems. Nerve growth factor plays an action in survival and growth of peripheral, sympathetic and sensory neurons along on numerous amounts of brain neurons. As far as neuropathic factors are concerned, NGF is the first discovered member of a family collectively indicated as neurotrophins. This includes, brain derived neurophin 4/5, neurotrophin-3 and nuerotrophic factor. For the sake of survival and differentiation of much selected population of peripheral neurons, NGF was discovered. Therefore, many studies took place to identify the role of purified NGF just for the sake of prevention of deaths of NGF-receptive cells. After all the studies, it was revealed to the researchers that NGF possesses good amount of therapeutic properties for diseases like, cutaneous ulcer, corneal ulcers, glaucoma, retinal maculopathy, Retinitis Pigmentosa along with optic gliomas and brain traumas.

Therefore, the researches and studies that took place on NGF showed new routes for the diagnostics along with that allowed safe amount of dosages to the effected patients. This thing widened the spectrum of therapy with the help of NGF based therapy.
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Bentham Science Publishers

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