Dr. Brenda Milner - first foreign associate of the NAS to receive Award in the Neurosciences

January 20, 2004

Montreal,- January 16, 2004 - Dr. Brenda Milner will receive the 2004 Award in the Neurosciences from the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) headquartered in Washington, DC. The $25,000 US prize is awarded every three years in recognition of extraordinary contributions to progress in the fields of neuroscience. Dr. Milner is the Dorothy J. Killam Professor, Montreal Neurological Institute (MNI), and a professor in the department of Neurology and Neurosurgery, Faculty of Medicine, McGill University. She is the first scientist outside of the United States to receive this award which will be presented on April 19 at a ceremony in Washington, D.C.

"We are absolutely delighted that Dr. Milner will receive the Award in the Neurosciences from the National Academy of Sciences in the United States. This is a highly prestigious award with a Nobel Laureate and Lasker Award winners amongst the previous recipients. Through her lifetime of research and teaching here at the MNI and McGill, Brenda Milner has had an extraordinary influence on the shape of neuroscience and on the lives of scientists around the world," said Dr. David Colman, Director of the MNI. "From her seminal work in the 1950's with Donald Hebb, Wilder Penfield, and William Scoville to 2004, Brenda continues to advance our knowledge and understanding of the brain and be a valued colleague".

"Brenda Milner is one of the giants of our time. Her delineation of memory dysfunction after lesions of the hippocampus has provided the basis for modern understanding of memory and for the divisions of memory storage mechanisms into explicit and implicit forms", said Dr. Eric Kandel, University Professor in the Center for Neurobiology and Behavior at Columbia University (New York), Senior Investigator of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Nobel laureate (Physiology or Medicine, 2000) and MNI Advisory Board Member. "The origins of modern cognitive neuroscience of memory can be traced directly to her rigorous and imaginative studies."

Dr. Milner's current research focuses on the specialization of the brain hemispheres. She and her colleagues are using sophisticated brain imaging technologies to examine differences between the right and left hemispheres. Dr. Milner is particularly interested in the role of the right hemisphere in remembering the location of objects.

Dr. Milner is a prestigious foreign associate of the NAS- one of only 14 from Canada. She was elected to the Academy in 1976. Dr. Milner is the recipient of more than two dozen honorary degrees and professional awards. She is a fellow of the Royal Society and holds the Order of Canada.

The NAS Award in the Neurosciences was established by a gift from the Fidia Research Foundation and has been presented since 1988. The award is open to the international scientific community and past recipients include Nobel laureate Dr. Paul Greengard and Lasker Awardees Drs. Vernon Mountcastle, Seymour Kety, Seymour Benzer and Louis Sokoloff. For more information on the NAS, please see http://www4.nationalacademies.org/nas/nashome.nsf.

The Montreal Neurological Institute (http://www.mni.mcgill.ca) is a McGill University (http://www.mcgill.ca) research and teaching institute, dedicated to the study of the nervous system and neurological diseases. Since its founding in 1934 by the renowned Dr. Wilder Penfield, the MNI has helped put Canada on the international map. It is one of the world's largest institutes of its kind; MNI researchers are world leaders in biotechnology, brain imaging, cognitive neuroscience and the study and treatment of epilepsy, multiple sclerosis and neuromuscular disorders.
-end-
For further information or to arrange to interview with Dr. Milner, please contact:
Dr. Sandra McPherson
Montreal Neurological Institute
Tel: 514-398-1902
Fax: 514-398-8072
Email: sandra.mcpherson@mcgill.ca

McGill University

Related Memory Articles from Brightsurf:

Memory of the Venus flytrap
In a study to be published in Nature Plants, a graduate student Mr.

Memory protein
When UC Santa Barbara materials scientist Omar Saleh and graduate student Ian Morgan sought to understand the mechanical behaviors of disordered proteins in the lab, they expected that after being stretched, one particular model protein would snap back instantaneously, like a rubber band.

Previously claimed memory boosting font 'Sans Forgetica' does not actually boost memory
It was previously claimed that the font Sans Forgetica could enhance people's memory for information, however researchers from the University of Warwick and the University of Waikato, New Zealand, have found after carrying out numerous experiments that the font does not enhance memory.

Memory boost with just one look
HRL Laboratories, LLC, researchers have published results showing that targeted transcranial electrical stimulation during slow-wave sleep can improve metamemories of specific episodes by 20% after only one viewing of the episode, compared to controls.

VR is not suited to visual memory?!
Toyohashi university of technology researcher and a research team at Tokyo Denki University have found that virtual reality (VR) may interfere with visual memory.

The genetic signature of memory
Despite their importance in memory, the human cortex and subcortex display a distinct collection of 'gene signatures.' The work recently published in eNeuro increases our understanding of how the brain creates memories and identifies potential genes for further investigation.

How long does memory last? For shape memory alloys, the longer the better
Scientists captured live action details of the phase transitions of shape memory alloys, giving them a better idea how to improve their properties for applications.

A NEAT discovery about memory
UAB researchers say over expression of NEAT1, an noncoding RNA, appears to diminish the ability of older brains to form memories.

Molecular memory can be used to increase the memory capacity of hard disks
Researchers at the University of Jyväskylä have taken part in an international British-Finnish-Chinese collaboration where the first molecule capable of remembering the direction of a magnetic above liquid nitrogen temperatures has been prepared and characterized.

Memory transferred between snails
Memories can be transferred between organisms by extracting ribonucleic acid (RNA) from a trained animal and injecting it into an untrained animal, as demonstrated in a study of sea snails published in eNeuro.

Read More: Memory News and Memory Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.