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What might Trump mean for chemistry? (video)

January 20, 2017

WASHINGTON, Jan. 20, 2017 -- Donald Trump is now the 45th president of the U.S. While much was said about a variety of topics during the presidential campaign, little was said about science. This leaves uncertainty around how the new administration will deal with science and how its approach will impact chemistry, research funding, trade policy and more. The latest Speaking of Chemistry video, produced by ACS' weekly newsmagazine Chemical & Engineering News, takes on this uncertainty by looking into how the emerging Trump administration policies might affect chemistry, the central science: https://youtu.be/XB0DNtXyd5w.
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Speaking of Chemistry is a production of Chemical & Engineering News, a weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society. It's the series that keeps you up to date with the important and fascinating chemistry shaping the world around you. Subscribe to the series at http://bit.ly/ACSReactions, and follow us on Twitter @CENMag.

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The American Chemical Society is a nonprofit organization chartered by the U.S. Congress. With nearly 157,000 members, ACS is the world's largest scientific society and a global leader in providing access to chemistry-related research through its multiple databases, peer-reviewed journals and scientific conferences. ACS does not conduct research, but publishes and publicizes peer-reviewed scientific studies. Its main offices are in Washington, D.C., and Columbus, Ohio.

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