Food, mood and behaviour

January 21, 2002

This release is available in PDF format by clicking here.

Can food help modulate mood and behaviour? In the third article in a series on clinical nutrition, Simon Young reviews the possible psychopharmacologic effect of several nutrients. He discusses the possible mild antidepressant effects of S-adenosylmethionine (SAMe), folic acid and tryptophan.

Young reviews the relation between carbohydrate consumption and sedation, the myth that sugar causes hyperactivity in children, and the developing understanding of the role of dietary fat in neural function.
-end-
p. 205 Clinical nutrition: 3. The fuzzy boundary between nutrition and psychopharmacology
-- S.N. Young

Contact: Dr. Simon Young, Department of Psychiatry, McGill University, Montreal; tel. 514 398-7317, email: syoung@med.mcgill.ca

Canadian Medical Association Journal

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