Nav: Home

Digital enhancement of cryoEM photographs of protein nanocrystals

January 21, 2016

When cryoEM images are obtained from protein nanocrystals the images themselves can appear to be devoid of any contrast. A group of scientists from the Netherlands have now demonstrated that lattice information can be revealed and enhanced by a specialized filter.

The procedure described by van Genderen et al. [(2016). Acta Cryst. D71, 34-39; doi: 10.1107/S205979831502149X] paves the way towards full three-dimensional structure determination at high resolution for protein crystals. The authors report on how lattice information can be enhanced by means of a wave finder in combination with Wiener-type maximum-likelihood filtering. The lattice filter is a very powerful tool for selecting and analysing extremely low contrast cryo-images of three dimensional protein/peptide nanocrystals. It confirms that the three-dimensional crystals are made up from multiple domains that are slightly differently oriented. Indeed, the algorithm can comfortably deal with multiple crystals with very different orientations, unit cells and/or space groups.

The authors of the paper propose the new lattice filter as a powerful tool for processing very noisy images with crystal factors (and thus the phase information) hidden within them. The filter is able to discriminate between noise images and the very noisy images with very low contrast which contain crystal-like structures. The lattice filter retains the shape of the spots in Fourier space and also retains any phase gradients within the Bragg spots (which determine the domain structure within the crystal). Thus, it retains all of the significant information from the Bragg spots. This will open the way to combining the phases acquired from stationary, two-dimensional images with intensities of rotation diffraction data taken from the same type of crystals. In this way, the authors expect to be able to phase the diffraction information of protein and peptide crystals.
-end-


International Union of Crystallography

Related Protein Articles:

Hi-res view of protein complex shows how it breaks up protein tangles
A new, high-resolution view of the structure of Hsp104 (heat shock protein 104), a natural yeast protein nanomachine with six subunits, may show news ways to dismantle harmful protein clumps in disease.
Breaking the protein-DNA bond
A new Northwestern University study finds that unbound proteins in a cell break up protein-DNA bonds as they compete for the single-binding site.
FASEB Science Research Conference: Protein Kinases and Protein Phosphorylation
This conference focuses on the biology of protein kinases and phosphorylation signaling.
Largest resource of human protein-protein interactions can help interpret genomic data
An international research team has developed the largest database of protein-to-protein interaction networks, a resource that can illuminate how numerous disease-associated genes contribute to disease development and progression.
STAT2: Much more than an antiviral protein
A protein known for guarding against viral infections leads a double life, new research shows, and can interfere with cell growth and the defense against parasites.
More Protein News and Protein Current Events

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Teaching For Better Humans
More than test scores or good grades — what do kids need to prepare them for the future? This hour, guest host Manoush Zomorodi and TED speakers explore how to help children grow into better humans, in and out of the classroom. Guests include educators Olympia Della Flora and Liz Kleinrock, psychologist Thomas Curran, and writer Jacqueline Woodson.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#535 Superior
Apologies for the delay getting this week's episode out! A technical glitch slowed us down, but all is once again well. This week, we look at the often troubling intertwining of science and race: its long history, its ability to persist even during periods of disrepute, and the current forms it takes as it resurfaces, leveraging the internet and nationalism to buoy itself. We speak with Angela Saini, independent journalist and author of the new book "Superior: The Return of Race Science", about where race science went and how it's coming back.