Nav: Home

Identification of a driver of fibrosis in chronic kidney disease

January 21, 2016

Chronic kidney disease can develop in response to a variety of insults and is characterized by progressive renal fibrosis and atrophy of kidney tubule. Therapeutic options are limited and the disease is often not detected until later stages. A new study in the inaugural issue of JCI Insight identifies the Wnt pathway modulator Dickkopf-3 (DKK3) as a driver of kidney fibrosis. A team led by Bernd Arnold and Hermann-Josef Gröne at the German Cancer Research Center in Heidelberg, Germany determined that DKK3 expression is elevated in tubular epithelia upon stress and associates with profibrotic T cell responses. In mouse models of CKD, genetic loss of Dkk3 or antibody blockade of DKK3 mitigated interstitial fibrosis and improved kidney function. DKK3 was secreted in the urine of mice following renal injury and associated with the extent of damage. Importantly, in patients with CKD of various etiologies, DKK3 levels in urine were elevated and correlated with the extent of fibrosis and tubular atrophy. The results of this study identify DKK3 as a driver of renal fibrosis and as a potential biomarker of disease severity.
-end-
TITLE: Tubular Dickkopf-3 promotes the development of renal atrophy and fibrosis

AUTHOR CONTACT: Hermann-Josef Gröne
German Cancer Research Center
Cellular and Molecular Pathology
Heidelberg, DEU
Email: h.-j.groene@dkfz.de

View this article at:http://insight.jci.org/articles/view/84916

JCI Insight is the newest publication from the American Society of Clinical Investigation, a nonprofit honor organization of physician-scientists. JCI Insight is dedicated to publishing a range of translational biomedical research with an emphasis on rigorous experimental methods and data reporting. All articles published in JCI Insight are freely available at the time of publication. For more information about JCI Insight go to http://www.insight.jci.org.

JCI Journals

Related Chronic Kidney Disease Articles:

Combating chronic kidney disease with exercise
A University of Delaware research team is combating chronic kidney disease (CKD) with exercise.
'Goldilocks' drug prevents chronic kidney disease in primates
A Massachusetts General Hospital research team has developed a way to avoid ischemia/reperfusion injury of the kidney with a new monoclonal antibody that binds its target receptor in a way that is 'just right.'
Reflux and ulcer medications linked to kidney stones and chronic kidney disease
Individuals who took proton pump inhibitors or histamine receptor-2 blockers for heartburn, acid reflux, or ulcers had elevated risks of developing kidney stones.
Allopurinol does not increase chronic kidney disease risk in gout patients
Allopurinol, a widely used treatment for lowering serum urate levels, does not appear to increase risk of kidney deterioration in gout patients with normal or near-normal kidney function, according to new research findings presented this week at the 2016 ACR/ARHP Annual Meeting in Washington.
Research connects first-time kidney stone formers and chronic kidney disease
Mayo Clinic nephrologists have uncovered a connection between first-time kidney stone formers and chronic kidney disease.
More Chronic Kidney Disease News and Chronic Kidney Disease Current Events

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Anthropomorphic
Do animals grieve? Do they have language or consciousness? For a long time, scientists resisted the urge to look for human qualities in animals. This hour, TED speakers explore how that is changing. Guests include biological anthropologist Barbara King, dolphin researcher Denise Herzing, primatologist Frans de Waal, and ecologist Carl Safina.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#534 Bacteria are Coming for Your OJ
What makes breakfast, breakfast? Well, according to every movie and TV show we've ever seen, a big glass of orange juice is basically required. But our morning grapefruit might be in danger. Why? Citrus greening, a bacteria carried by a bug, has infected 90% of the citrus groves in Florida. It's coming for your OJ. We'll talk with University of Maryland plant virologist Anne Simon about ways to stop the citrus killer, and with science writer and journalist Maryn McKenna about why throwing antibiotics at the problem is probably not the solution. Related links: A Review of the Citrus Greening...