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Dramatic decline in complaints by imprisoned transgender patients after staff LGBT training

January 21, 2016

New Rochelle, NY, January 21, 2015--A new study of the quality of healthcare provided to transgender patients in the New York City correctional system revealed significant areas for improvement and reported a greater than 50% decrease in patient complaints after the healthcare staff at 12 jail clinics received Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender (LGBT) training. Within 6 months of implementing a revised transgender health care policy, patient complaints dropped to zero, according to the study results published in LGBT Health, a peer-reviewed journal from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers. The article is available free on the LGBT Health website until February 21, 2016.

In the article "Improving Transgender Healthcare in the New York City Correctional System", Mohamed Jaffer, PA, Homer Venters, MD, and coauthors from the Bureau of Correctional Health Services, New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene (Queens, NY), describe their efforts to review the adequacy of care for transgender patients in the New York City jail system. The researchers identified areas for improvement in the provision of care and in staff understanding of the transgender patient population. They describe their deliberative approach to developing revised policies for transgender health care that take into account community standards and patient requests, and their efforts to gain acceptance of the new policies by both patients and staff.

"This paper is an important contribution to the sparse literature on transgender inmates in correctional settings and addresses topics that are the subject of widespread litigation," says LGBT Health Editor-in-Chief William Byne, MD, PhD, James J Peters VA Medical Center, (Bronx, NY), and Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, (New York, NY).
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About the Journal

LGBT Health, published bimonthly online with Open Access options and in print, brings together the LGBT research, health care, and advocacy communities to address current challenges and improve the health, well-being, and clinical outcomes of LGBT persons. Spanning a broad array of disciplines, the Journal publishes peer-reviewed original research, review articles, clinical reports, case studies, legal and policy perspectives, and much more. Complete tables of content and a sample issue may be viewed on the LGBT Health website.

About the Publisher

Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers is a privately held, fully integrated media company known for establishing authoritative medical and biomedical peer-reviewed journals, including Transgender Health, AIDS Patient Care and STDs, AIDS Research and Human Retroviruses, Journal of Women's Health, and Population Health Management. Its biotechnology trade magazine, Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News (GEN), was the first in its field and is today the industry's most widely read publication worldwide. A complete list of the firm's more than 80 journals, newsmagazines, and books is available on the Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers website.

Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News

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