Teamwork in a molecule

January 21, 2021

"Such reactions are usually carried out using transition metals, such as nickel or iridium," explains Prof. Robert Kretschmer, Junior Professor of Inorganic Chemistry at the University of Jena, whose work has been published in the prestigious Journal of the American Chemical Society. "However, transition metals are expensive and harmful to the environment, both when they are mined and when they are used. Therefore, we are trying to find better alternatives." That two metals can do more than one is already known in the case of transition metals. "However, there has been hardly any research on the more sustainable main-group metals of the periodic table," Kretschmer adds.

Hand in hand

"Our compound contains two chemically identical gallium atoms," says Kretschmer. "In tests with a series of fluorine-containing hydrocarbon compounds, we saw that these two atoms together are capable of removing a fluorine atom. Using X-ray structure analysis, we were able to prove that one gallium atom binds the fluorine and the other binds the other part of the hydrocarbon compound." This is the first step needed for catalysis.

"Now that this step has been achieved, we can consider how to develop this concept further," explains Kretschmer. "It would of course be desirable if, at the end, the reaction could be continued to achieve a complete catalytic cycle." However, this will probably involve a different metal. Kretschmer notes: "Gallium as an element was a first step here. Our goal is ultimately to harness the metal that occurs most frequently on earth: aluminium."
-end-
Original publication

Oleksandr Kysliak, Helmar Görls and Robert Kretschmer, „Cooperative Bond Activation by a Bimetallic Main-Group Complex", Journal of the American Chemical Society, 2021, (143:1), 142-148. DOI: 10.1021/jacs.0c12166

Contact:

Robert Kretschmer
Junior Professorship of Anorganic Chemistry of Catalysis
Institute for Inorganic and Analytical Chemistry of Friedrich Schiller University Jena
Humboldtstraße 8, 07743 Jena, Germany
Phone: +49 3641 9-48 911
Email: robert.kretschmer@uni-jena.de

Friedrich-Schiller-Universitaet Jena

Related Atoms Articles from Brightsurf:

How to gently caress atoms
It is extremely difficult to study oxygen molecules on the metal oxide surface without altering them.

'Hot and messy' entanglement of 15 trillion atoms
In a study published in Nature Communications, ICFO, HDU and UPV researchers report the production of a giant entangled state that may help medical researchers detect extremely faint magnetic signals from the brain.

Exciting apparatus helps atoms see the light
Researchers in the Light-Matter Interactions for Quantum Technologies Unit at the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University (OIST) have generated Rydberg atoms - unusually large excited atoms - near nanometer-thin optical fibers.

Manipulating atoms to make better superconductors
A new study by University of Illinois at Chicago researchers published in the journal Nature Communications shows that it is possible to manipulate individual atoms so that they begin working in a collective pattern that has the potential to become superconducting at higher temperatures.

Grabbing atoms
In a first for quantum physics, University of Otago researchers have 'held' individual atoms in place and observed previously unseen complex atomic interactions.

Chemists allow boron atoms to migrate
Organic molecules with atoms of the semi-metal boron are important building blocks for synthesis products to produce drugs and agricultural chemicals.

2D materials: arrangement of atoms measured in silicene
Silicene consists of a single layer of silicon atoms. In contrast to the ultra-flat material graphene, which is made of carbon, silicene shows surface irregularities that influence its electronic properties.

Atoms don't like jumping rope
Nanooptical traps are a promising building block for quantum technologies.

2000 atoms in two places at once
The quantum superposition principle has been tested on a scale as never before in a new study by scientists at the University of Vienna.

Single atoms as catalysts
Only the outermost layer of a catalyst can play a role in chemical reactions.

Read More: Atoms News and Atoms Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.