DOE to announce plans for geothermal R&D at Stanford Geothermal Workshop

January 22, 2015

Jay Nathwani, acting director of the U.S. Dept. of Energy's Geothermal Technologies Office, will discuss the DOE's plans to accelerate the development of geothermal energy at the 40th annual Stanford Geothermal Workshop. The event takes place Jan. 26-28 at Stanford University's Arrillaga Alumni Center.

Geothermal energy produces 5% of California's electricity and is used to heat buildings in 43 countries. However, it could become a far larger global resource with the successful development of some technologies, like the application of hydraulic fracturing to get water to hot, dry rock thousands of feet below ground. This three-day workshop will feature research and development results from dozens of universities around the world, U.S. federal research laboratories and private companies.

Some research results to be presented:
-end-
For more information visit:

https://earth.stanford.edu/researchgroups/geothermal/stanford-geothermal-workshop

Contact: Mark Golden, Stanford Precourt Institute for Energy, (650) 724-1629, mark.golden@stanford.edu

Stanford University

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