Nav: Home

American Cancer Society honors Marcia M. Grant with Quality of Life Award

January 22, 2016

The American Cancer Society recognized Marcia M. Grant, RN, PhD, FAAN, with the 2016 American Cancer Society Trish Greene Quality of Life Award, a prestigious national honor that recognizes an outstanding individual who dedicates a significant portion of their career to research that improves the quality of life for cancer patients and their families.

This award honors the life and work of the late Patricia (Trish) Greene, RN, PhD. Dr. Greene served in a variety of roles as both a volunteer and professional staff member throughout her 20 year association with the Society. The Trish Greene Quality of Life Award honors Dr. Greene's memory and recognizes the significant contributions that researchers have made in the journey to achieving excellence in compassionate care for people facing cancer.

"The American Cancer Society is pleased to honor Professor Grant for her dedication and outstanding influences in cancer research and providing quality supportive care for patients," said Marion E. Morra, MA, ScD, chair, Trish Greene Quality of Life Award Workgroup, American Cancer Society. "Professor Grant has dedicated her career to serving cancer patients and helping to eliminate suffering."

Grant is one of the nation's most respected and influential research nurses. During the past 40 years at the City of Hope Medical Center, she pioneered innovative education and research initiatives providing high-quality supportive care for cancer patients' physical, emotional and spiritual well-being.

As professor and director of nursing research and education, Grant is seen as an international influential leader to students and throughout the oncology community.

She has devoted her career to research that continually improves the quality of life for cancer patients, and she has been funded by the National Cancer Institute for more than 25 years. She continues to create innovative processes to help empower nurses across the nation to provide quality survivorship care and support for cancer patients and their families.
-end-
About the American Cancer Society

The American Cancer Society is a global grassroots force of 2.5 million volunteers saving lives and fighting for every birthday threatened by every cancer in every community. As the largest voluntary health organization, the Society's efforts have contributed to a 22 percent decline in cancer death rates in the U.S. since 1991, and a 50 percent drop in smoking rates. Thanks in part to our progress; 14.5 million Americans who have had cancer and countless more who have avoided it will celebrate more birthdays this year. We're determined to finish the fight against cancer. We're finding cures as the nation's largest private, not-for-profit investor in cancer research, ensuring people facing cancer have the help they need and continuing the fight for access to quality health care, lifesaving screenings, clean air, and more. For more information, to get help, or to join the fight, call us anytime, day or night, at 1-800-227-2345 or visit cancer.org.

American Cancer Society

Related Cancer Patients Articles:

The art of cancer caregiving: How art therapies benefits those caring for cancer patients
A recent Drexel University study showed coloring and open-studio art therapy benefits stressed caregivers of cancer patients.
Stress in cervical cancer patients associated with higher risk of cancer-specific mortality
Psychological stress was associated with a higher risk of cancer-specific mortality in women diagnosed with cervical cancer.
Cancer tissue-freezing approach may help more breast cancer patients in lower income countries
A new reusable device created by the Johns Hopkins University can help women with breast cancer in lower income countries by using carbon dioxide, a widely available and affordable gas, to power a cancer tissue-freezing probe instead of industry-standard argon.
Lots of patients with cancer, cancer survivors use but don't report complementary/alternative medicine therapies
This study used data from a nationwide survey to estimate how many patients with cancer and cancer survivors use complementary and alternative medicines (CAMS) in addition to or instead of conventional therapies, and how many don't disclose that to their physicians.
Colorectal cancer in patients with early onset is distinct from that in older patients
New research indicates that colorectal cancer diagnosed at an early age has clinical and genetic features that are different from those seen in traditional colorectal cancer diagnosed later in life.
Comparable risk of recurrent venous thromboembolism between patients with unprovoked venous thromboembolism and patients with cancer
Patients with venous thromboembolism (VTE) carry a high risk of recurrence.
Personalized cancer vaccine may increase long-term survival in patients with deadly brain cancer
An international Phase III study led by researchers at UCLA has found that a personalized GBM vaccine may increase long-term survival in some patients.
Ovarian cancer drug shows promise in pancreatic cancer patients with BRCA mutation
A targeted therapy that has shown its power in fighting ovarian cancer in women including those with BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations may also help patients with aggressive pancreatic cancer who harbor these mutations and have few or no other treatment options.
Patients with blood cancer precursor at risk of developing cancer even after 30 years
Patients with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance are at risk of progressing to multiple myeloma or a related cancer -- even after 30 years of stability.
Cancer drug starts clinical trials in human brain-cancer patients
A drug that spurs cancer cells to self-destruct has been cleared for use in a clinical trial of human patients with anaplastic astrocytoma, a rare malignant brain tumor, and glioblastoma multiforme, an aggressive late-stage cancer of the brain.
More Cancer Patients News and Cancer Patients Current Events

Top Science Podcasts

We have hand picked the top science podcasts of 2019.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Accessing Better Health
Essential health care is a right, not a privilege ... or is it? This hour, TED speakers explore how we can give everyone access to a healthier way of life, despite who you are or where you live. Guests include physician Raj Panjabi, former NYC health commissioner Mary Bassett, researcher Michael Hendryx, and neuroscientist Rachel Wurzman.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#544 Prosperity Without Growth
The societies we live in are organised around growth, objects, and driving forward a constantly expanding economy as benchmarks of success and prosperity. But this growing consumption at all costs is at odds with our understanding of what our planet can support. How do we lower the environmental impact of economic activity? How do we redefine success and prosperity separate from GDP, which politicians and governments have focused on for decades? We speak with ecological economist Tim Jackson, Professor of Sustainable Development at the University of Surrey, Director of the Centre for the Understanding of Sustainable Propserity, and author of...
Now Playing: Radiolab

An Announcement from Radiolab