Dynamic DNA Structures in Biology

January 22, 2016

Bethesda, MD - For decades after its discovery, genomic DNA was believed to exist only as a right-handed, double helix known as B-DNA. Its sole functions were to serve as a template for RNA synthesis or as a template for the production of identical duplexes during chromosome replication. These core beliefs were shaken by the discovery that DNA is covalently modified and packaged into chromatin, and that the molecule can form an enormous variety of non-B alternative structures, including cruciforms, a left-handed helix, three- and four-stranded helices, and slip-strand configurations. Transient denaturation of the duplex during all major DNA transactions (replication, transcription, repair and recombination) requires chromatin modifications and promotes dynamic transitions to non-B DNA structures.

Furthermore, repetitive DNA sequences, which are highly over-represented in genomic DNA, are particularly prone to structural transitions. Studies conducted in many labs worldwide have confirmed that structural transitions are not only central to normal functions of the genome, but also are responsible for occasional malfunctioning that leads to a disease state. The most striking example is expansion of structure-prone DNA repeats, which is responsible for more than thirty hereditary neurological and developmental diseases.

This SRC is the fourth meeting on Dynamic DNA Structures in Biology, a highly interactive meeting that brings together a diverse, international community of researchers who maintain a "DNA-centric" view of basic biological processes. Attendees will include those interested in disease-causing repeat expansions, chromatin dynamics, chromosome fragility related to transcription and replication, and the biological roles of unusual, non-B DNA structures. Morning and evening scientific sessions will feature established and new investigators, and ample time for discussion will be incorporated into the program. In addition, short talks chosen from submitted abstracts will be included in session, with preference given to trainees. Afternoon poster sessions will further foster the exchange of ideas and facilitate the establishment of new collaborations. It is anticipated that funds will be available to support the attendance of young investigators and trainees.

FASEB has announced a total of 36 Science Research Conferences (SRC) in 2016. Registration opens January 7, 2016. For more information about an SRC, view preliminary programs, or find a listing of all our 2016 SRCs, please visit http://www.faseb.org/SRC.
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Since 1982, FASEB SRC has offered a continuing series of inter-disciplinary exchanges that are recognized as a valuable complement to the highly successful society meetings. Divided into small groups, scientists from around the world meet intimately and without distractions to explore new approaches to those research areas undergoing rapid scientific changes. In efforts to expand the SRC series, potential organizers are encouraged to contact SRC staff at SRC@faseb.org. Proposal guidelines can be found at http://www.faseb.org/SRC.

FASEB is composed of 30 societies with more than 125,000 members, making it the largest coalition of biomedical research associations in the United States. Our mission is to advance health and welfare by promoting progress and education in biological and biomedical sciences through service to our member societies and collaborative advocacy.

Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology

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