Nav: Home

Functional disulfide bonds in health and disease

January 22, 2016

Bethesda, MD - Most proteins are chemically modified after they are made to control how, when, and where they function. It was thought that only the amino acid side chains and the peptide bonds of proteins were chemically modified. It has become clear in recent years that the disulfide bonds of proteins are also modified. Some disulphide bonds are cleaved in the mature protein to control function. From a few examples a decade ago, there are now about thirty well defined examples of control of protein function by functional disulfides and dozens more examples that are under investigation. Cleavage of a functional disulfide in a protein changes the bioactivity of the protein. Changes in ligand binding, substrate hydrolysis, proteolysis, or oligomer formation have been described. The functional disulfides are cleaved by reductases or by thiol-disulfide exchange. Viral, bacterial, plant and mammalian proteins have been found to be regulated by functional disulfides, so this mechanism of protein control operates in all life forms. The early indications are that cleavage of disulphide bonds may rival proteolysis of peptide bonds as a means of protein control.

This conference will focus on the functional disulfides that contribute to regulation of thrombosis, inflammation and immunity in mammals. How protein function in these systems is regulated by disulfide bond cleavage and the factors that cleave the bonds will be discussed. The chemistry and molecular dynamics of cleavage of functional disulfides will be addressed, and the bioinformatic and experimental approaches used to identify and study these bonds will be examined. Some functional disulfides have been linked to human disease and progress is being made on ways of targeting these bonds for new diagnostics and therapies. Small molecule inhibitors of the factors that cleave functional disulfides are in pre-clinical and clinical development.

The invited presentations will be from both established and junior investigators and a large number of oral presentations will be selected from the abstracts. The talks, poster presentations and recreational activities will provide students and postdoctoral fellows with opportunities to exchange ideas, formulate new collaborations and explore career options in this research field.

FASEB has announced a total of 36 Science Research Conferences (SRC) in 2016. Registration opens Jan. 7, 2016. For more information about an SRC, view preliminary programs, or find a listing of all our 2016 SRCs, please visit http://www.faseb.org/SRC.
-end-
Since 1982, FASEB SRC has offered a continuing series of inter-disciplinary exchanges that are recognized as a valuable complement to the highly successful society meetings. Divided into small groups, scientists from around the world meet intimately and without distractions to explore new approaches to those research areas undergoing rapid scientific changes. In efforts to expand the SRC series, potential organizers are encouraged to contact SRC staff at SRC@faseb.org. Proposal guidelines can be found at http://www.faseb.org/SRC.

FASEB is composed of 30 societies with more than 125,000 members, making it the largest coalition of biomedical research associations in the United States. Our mission is to advance health and welfare by promoting progress and education in biological and biomedical sciences through service to our member societies and collaborative advocacy.

Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology

Related Proteins Articles:

Coupled proteins
Researchers from Heidelberg University and Sendai University in Japan used new biotechnological methods to study how human cells react to and further process external signals.
Understanding the power of honey through its proteins
Honey is a culinary staple that can be found in kitchens around the world.
How proteins become embedded in a cell membrane
Many proteins with important biological functions are embedded in a biomembrane in the cells of humans and other living organisms.
Finding the proteins that unpack DNA
A new method allows researchers to systematically identify specialized proteins called 'nuclesome displacing factors' that unpack DNA inside the nucleus of a cell, making the usually dense DNA more accessible for gene expression and other functions.
A brewer's tale of proteins and beer
The transformation of barley grains into beer is an old story, typically starring water, yeast and hops.
New tool for the crystallization of proteins
ETH researchers have developed a new method of crystallizing large membrane proteins in order to determine their structure.
New interaction mechanism of proteins discovered
UZH researchers have discovered a previously unknown way in which proteins interact with one another and cells organize themselves.
When proteins shake hands
Protein nanofibres often have outstanding properties such as a high stability, biodegradability, or antibacterial effect.
Proteins' fluorescence a little less mysterious
Rice University scientists use simulations to understand the mechanism behind a popular fluorescent protein used to monitor signals between neurons.
New study suggests health benefits of swapping animal proteins for plant proteins
Substituting one to two servings of animal proteins with plant proteins every day could lead to a small reduction in the three main cholesterol markers for cardiovascular disease prevention, a new study suggests.
More Proteins News and Proteins Current Events

Top Science Podcasts

We have hand picked the top science podcasts of 2019.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

In & Out Of Love
We think of love as a mysterious, unknowable force. Something that happens to us. But what if we could control it? This hour, TED speakers on whether we can decide to fall in — and out of — love. Guests include writer Mandy Len Catron, biological anthropologist Helen Fisher, musician Dessa, One Love CEO Katie Hood, and psychologist Guy Winch.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#543 Give a Nerd a Gift
Yup, you guessed it... it's Science for the People's annual holiday episode that helps you figure out what sciency books and gifts to get that special nerd on your list. Or maybe you're looking to build up your reading list for the holiday break and a geeky Christmas sweater to wear to an upcoming party. Returning are pop-science power-readers John Dupuis and Joanne Manaster to dish on the best science books they read this past year. And Rachelle Saunders and Bethany Brookshire squee in delight over some truly delightful science-themed non-book objects for those whose bookshelves are already full. Since...
Now Playing: Radiolab

An Announcement from Radiolab