Nav: Home

Genome engineering: Cutting-edge research and applications

January 22, 2016

Bethesda, MD - Genome engineering is a rapidly growing discipline that seeks to develop new technologies for the precise manipulation of genes and genomes in cellula and in vivo. In addition to its utility for advancing our understanding of basic biology, genome engineering has numerous real-world applications, ranging from correction of disease-causing mutations in humans to engineering plants that better provide fuel, food and industrial raw materials. The first clinical trials and patient treatments using genome engineering approaches are now a reality. The scope of this meeting is expansive, encompassing multiple approaches for modifying genomes - from transgenesis and gene targeting to the creation of synthetic genomes. The experimental models featured include bacteria, fungi, model organisms (e.g.-- Drosophila, C. elegans, zebrafish, mice, rats), plants, humans, and animals including livestock. We anticipate that this diversity of approaches and experimental systems will create a stimulating meeting environment that will enable new insights and advance the field.

The 2016 meeting is the fourth on this topic and we have selected speakers and designed a program to highlight the major advances since the last meeting. Additional oral presentations will be selected from submitted abstracts. There will also be the opportunity for poster presentations at a dynamic and interactive poster session. Social and recreational activities will provide all registrants, including students and postdoctoral fellows, with opportunities to exchange ideas and develop new collaborations. It is anticipated that there will be funds available to support attendance of early career researchers.

FASEB has announced a total of 36 Science Research Conferences (SRC) in 2016. Registration opens Jan. 7, 2016. For more information about an SRC, view preliminary programs, or find a listing of all our 2016 SRCs, please visit http://www.faseb.org/SRC.
-end-
Since 1982, FASEB SRC has offered a continuing series of inter-disciplinary exchanges that are recognized as a valuable complement to the highly successful society meetings. Divided into small groups, scientists from around the world meet intimately and without distractions to explore new approaches to those research areas undergoing rapid scientific changes. In efforts to expand the SRC series, potential organizers are encouraged to contact SRC staff at SRC@faseb.org. Proposal guidelines can be found at http://www.faseb.org/SRC.

FASEB is composed of 30 societies with more than 125,000 members, making it the largest coalition of biomedical research associations in the United States. Our mission is to advance health and welfare by promoting progress and education in biological and biomedical sciences through service to our member societies and collaborative advocacy.

Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology

Related Genomes Articles:

Uncovered: 1,000 new microbial genomes
US Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute scientists have taken a decisive step forward in uncovering the planet's microbial diversity.
The evolutionary story of birch, told through 80 genomes
A new study sequences the genomes of 80 silver birch trees, a tree that has not been studied much by scientists despite its commercial value for papermaking, construction, furniture-building and more.
The proteins that domesticated our genomes
EPFL scientists have carried out a genomic and evolutionary study of a large and enigmatic family of human proteins, to demonstrate that it is responsible for harnessing the millions of transposable elements in the human genome.
NIST releases new 'family' of standardized genomes
With the addition of four new reference materials (RMs) to a growing collection of 'measuring sticks' for gene sequencing, the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) can now provide laboratories with even more capability to accurately 'map' DNA for genetic testing, medical diagnoses and future customized drug therapies.
Warbler genomes look to be 99.97 percent alike
New research from the Cornell Lab of Ornithology's Fuller Evolutionary Biology Program shows that, genetically speaking, blue-winged and golden-winged warblers are almost identical.
Bird genomes contain 'fossils' of parasites that now infect humans
In rare instances, DNA is known to have jumped from one species to another.
Wine yeast genomes lack diversity
Sequencing the genomes of hundreds of strains of the wine yeast S. cerevisiae has revealed little genetic diversity and high levels of inbreeding.
A new approach to sequence and assemble primate genomes
An improved version of the gorilla genome assembly is offering new biological insights into its evolution, and to what makes humans different from this great ape primate.
Grafted plants' genomes can communicate with each other
Salk scientists find tiny molecules drive gene silencing across grafted shoots.
Ancient genomes reveal that the English are one-third Anglo-Saxon
For the first time, researchers at the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute have been able to directly estimate the Anglo-Saxon ancestry of the British population, using ancient skeletons.

Related Genomes Reading:

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Anthropomorphic
Do animals grieve? Do they have language or consciousness? For a long time, scientists resisted the urge to look for human qualities in animals. This hour, TED speakers explore how that is changing. Guests include biological anthropologist Barbara King, dolphin researcher Denise Herzing, primatologist Frans de Waal, and ecologist Carl Safina.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#SB2 2019 Science Birthday Minisode: Mary Golda Ross
Our second annual Science Birthday is here, and this year we celebrate the wonderful Mary Golda Ross, born 9 August 1908. She died in 2008 at age 99, but left a lasting mark on the science of rocketry and space exploration as an early woman in engineering, and one of the first Native Americans in engineering. Join Rachelle and Bethany for this very special birthday minisode celebrating Mary and her achievements. Thanks to our Patreons who make this show possible! Read more about Mary G. Ross: Interview with Mary Ross on Lash Publications International, by Laurel Sheppard Meet Mary Golda...