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GTPases in Trafficking, Autophagy and Disease

January 22, 2016

Bethesda, MD - Arf, Arl, Rab and Rag GTPases control traffic, proteostasis, membrane dynamics, signaling and lipid metabolism. Intensive investigation of the cellular, molecular and structural mechanisms has led to surprising discoveries and paradigm shifts such as non-classical interactions and modifications controlling localization and function. New fields have emerged (e.g. Rag GTPases in proteostasis), and dis-regulation of small GTPase networks has been implicated in human disease conditions from inherited disorders to complex disease states.

This SRC brings together investigators interested in trafficking regulation, membrane dynamics, proteostasis, and disease etiology for a focused meeting titled, "GTPases in Trafficking, Autophagy and Disease". Represented disciplines will include biochemists, structural biologists, membrane biologists, cell biologists, geneticists, bioinformaticists, systems biologists, developmental biologists, neurobiologists, microbiologists, cancer biologists, virologists, immunologists, and others. This exceptional diversity reflects the fundamental role of trafficking GTPases in biological processes and disease. There will be ten sessions on topics such as Activation and deactivation of GTPases, Regulation of and by post translational modifications, Structural and molecular mechanisms, Small GTPases in the endocytic system, Small GTPases in the secretory system, Small GTPases in membrane trafficking in specialized cells, Autophagy, Rag GTPases, and GTPases and disease. The sessions will include 30 regular talks and at least 12 short talks selected from abstracts. The opening session will include an Overview of the evolution of trafficking GTPases followed by 2 min preview talks by poster presenters. In addition to talks and poster sessions, recreational activities will provide opportunities for students, postdoctoral fellows, new investigators and established leaders to interact and explore collaborative possibilities.

FASEB has announced a total of 36 Science Research Conferences (SRC) in 2016. Registration opens January 7, 2016. For more information about an SRC, view preliminary programs, or find a listing of all our 2016 SRCs, please visit http://www.faseb.org/SRC.
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Since 1982, FASEB SRC has offered a continuing series of inter-disciplinary exchanges that are recognized as a valuable complement to the highly successful society meetings. Divided into small groups, scientists from around the world meet intimately and without distractions to explore new approaches to those research areas undergoing rapid scientific changes. In efforts to expand the SRC series, potential organizers are encouraged to contact SRC staff at SRC@faseb.org. Proposal guidelines can be found at http://www.faseb.org/SRC.

FASEB is composed of 30 societies with more than 125,000 members, making it the largest coalition of biomedical research associations in the United States. Our mission is to advance health and welfare by promoting progress and education in biological and biomedical sciences through service to our member societies and collaborative advocacy.

Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology

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