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IgE and Allergy, 50 Years and Onward

January 22, 2016

Bethesda, MD - This SRC celebrates the 50th anniversary of the discovery of IgE, the last of the classes of human antibodies to be identified, by presenting the latest ideas in the field and looking forward to future advances in our understanding of this molecule. All aspects of IgE biology will be covered, including IgE structure and receptor interactions, biogenesis and regulation of IgE, the biology of IgE effector cells such as mast cells and basophils, the role of IgE in allergy and immunity, and the prospects for IgE-targeted therapeutic intervention in allergic disease. It will feature critical aspects of physiology and pathology related to allergic disease, such as the contributions of other immune effector cells, animal models, and the process of translation from bench to clinic.

The following scientists, clinicians, and regulatory experts at all levels should attend:
  • Specialists in the biology of mast cells and basophils and their interplay with other immune cells
  • Specialists in immune receptor biology, including the IgE receptors (FcεRI and CD23), chemokine, cytokine and negative regulatory receptors on mast cells and basophils
  • Structural biologists interested in IgE/receptor interactions and IgE/allergen recognition
  • Experts in allergic diseases, including asthma, atopic dermatitis, urticaria and food allergies
A number of oral presentations will be selected from the abstracts, and the selected talks, poster presentations, and recreational activities will provide students and postdoctoral fellows opportunities to exchange ideas and formulate new collaborations.

FASEB has announced a total of 36 Science Research Conferences (SRC) in 2016. Registration opens January 7, 2016. For more information about an SRC, view preliminary programs, or find a listing of all our 2016 SRCs, please visit http://www.faseb.org/SRC.
-end-
Since 1982, FASEB SRC has offered a continuing series of inter-disciplinary exchanges that are recognized as a valuable complement to the highly successful society meetings. Divided into small groups, scientists from around the world meet intimately and without distractions to explore new approaches to those research areas undergoing rapid scientific changes. In efforts to expand the SRC series, potential organizers are encouraged to contact SRC staff at SRC@faseb.org. Proposal guidelines can be found at http://www.faseb.org/SRC.

FASEB is composed of 30 societies with more than 125,000 members, making it the largest coalition of biomedical research associations in the United States. Our mission is to advance health and welfare by promoting progress and education in biological and biomedical sciences through service to our member societies and collaborative advocacy.

Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology

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