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Immunological Aspects of Obesity

January 22, 2016

Bethesda, MD - This FASEB Conference focuses on the interactions between obesity and immune cells, focusing in particular on how inflammation in various organs influences obesity and obesity-related complications. Obesity, insulin resistance, and type 2 diabetes have increased at epidemic proportions over the past several decades. Our understanding of adipose tissue has evolved greatly, even as this epidemic continues to rage. Once considered to be primarily a fuel storage organ, adipose tissue is now known to have a number of endocrine actions and immunomodulatory properties. While adipocytes make up the bulk of adipose tissue by volume, this tissue is also home to a variety of immune cells which interact in a complex interplay of cytokines and contact-mediated interactions. These processes modulate immunological and inflammatory processes throughout the body, resulting in large effects on whole body physiology. Importantly, the immunological and inflammatory influences of obesity likely contribute to many of the obesity-associated complications, such as insulin resistance, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and cancer.

In this context, the organizers have brought together a wide and diverse range of leaders in the fields of immunology, inflammation, and obesity, to share their latest findings on this evolving field. Individual sessions will focus on the separate roles of adaptive and innate immunity in immunometabolism; how obesity affects inflammation in organs such as the gut, the brain, and the liver; how inflammation develops with aging, and how it resolves; and how obesity-related inflammation promotes cancer. There will be opportunity for poster presentations and social and recreational activities, to promote discussion and networking amongst attendees, including students and post-doctoral fellows.

FASEB has announced a total of 36 Science Research Conferences (SRC) in 2016. Registration opens January 7, 2016. For more information about an SRC, view preliminary programs, or find a listing of all our 2016 SRCs, please visit http://www.faseb.org/SRC.
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Since 1982, FASEB SRC has offered a continuing series of inter-disciplinary exchanges that are recognized as a valuable complement to the highly successful society meetings. Divided into small groups, scientists from around the world meet intimately and without distractions to explore new approaches to those research areas undergoing rapid scientific changes. In efforts to expand the SRC series, potential organizers are encouraged to contact SRC staff at SRC@faseb.org. Proposal guidelines can be found at http://www.faseb.org/SRC.

FASEB is composed of 30 societies with more than 125,000 members, making it the largest coalition of biomedical research associations in the United States. Our mission is to advance health and welfare by promoting progress and education in biological and biomedical sciences through service to our member societies and collaborative advocacy.

Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology

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