Nav: Home

KLF and Sp Transcription Factors in Disease and Regenerative Medicine

January 22, 2016

Bethesda, MD - This meeting will focus on the genetics, biochemistry, and biology of Krüppel-like factors (KLFs) as well as their structurally and functionally related, Specificity Proteins (Sps) along with their impact on human diseases. Significant efforts will be given to discussing the application of KLF/SP-based tools to gene editing and cell-based therapies for regenerative medicine (iPS cells). KLFs/SP proteins constitute a single family of zinc finger-containing transcription factors that exhibit homology to the Drosophila gap gene product, Krüppel. There are at least 18 KLFs and 9 Sp proteins, with a multitude of important functions including regulation of proliferation, differentiation, inflammation/immunity, metabolism, and carcinogenesis. Dysregulation of KLF/SP-mediated pathways contributes to pathological states such as obesity, cancer, and inflammatory conditions. Recent studies indicate that many of these transcription factors have the ability to reprogram somatic cells to inducible pluripotent stem (iPS) cells, and to maintain the pluripotent state of embryonic stem cells; interestingly, several members can substitute for one another in establishing and/or maintaining pluripotency. This transformational discovery has elicited the attention of investigators and medical practitioners from the field of Regenerative Medicine. Molecular insights derived from zinc finger-DNA interactions, which have been derived and most thoroughly validated from work on Sp/KLF proteins has given rise to a new area of research that is growing exponentially, namely gene-editing by artificial KLF-like zinc finger proteins that allow for in vivo gene mutation, mutation repair, deletions, insertion and other type of engineering for both research and medical practice. Thus, the scope and the impact of our 2016 meeting, we will have investigators that discuss the use of Zinc finger nucleases, TALENS, and CAS/CRISPR systems. Lastly, many additional and novel roles for various Sp/KLFs in normal and disease states are only now being fully studied and explored. We expect that through the interaction fostered in this meeting will fuel subsequent collaborations, lead to the design of new diagnostic and therapeutic approaches for broad array diseases. This is truly and international meeting which counts with a confirmed list of speakers from USA, Canada, Europe, and Asia. A large number of oral presentations will be selected from the abstracts, and the selected talks, poster presentations, and recreational activities will provide students and postdoctoral fellows opportunities to exchange ideas and formulate new collaborations.

FASEB has announced a total of 36 Science Research Conferences (SRC) in 2016. Registration opens January 7, 2016. For more information about an SRC, view preliminary programs, or find a listing of all our 2016 SRCs, please visit http://www.faseb.org/SRC.
-end-
Since 1982, FASEB SRC has offered a continuing series of inter-disciplinary exchanges that are recognized as a valuable complement to the highly successful society meetings. Divided into small groups, scientists from around the world meet intimately and without distractions to explore new approaches to those research areas undergoing rapid scientific changes. In efforts to expand the SRC series, potential organizers are encouraged to contact SRC staff at SRC@faseb.org. Proposal guidelines can be found at http://www.faseb.org/SRC.

FASEB is composed of 30 societies with more than 125,000 members, making it the largest coalition of biomedical research associations in the United States. Our mission is to advance health and welfare by promoting progress and education in biological and biomedical sciences through service to our member societies and collaborative advocacy.

Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology

Related Regenerative Medicine Articles:

MDI Biological Laboratory to offer symposium on latest advances in regenerative medicine
The MDI Biological Laboratory in Bar Harbor, Maine, will sponsor a symposium entitled 'Learning from Nature: Comparative Biology of Tissue Regeneration and Aging,' Aug.
Canada continues to punch above its weight in the field of regenerative medicine
A new workshop report, Building on Canada's Strengths in Regenerative Medicine, released today by the Council of Canadian Academies (CCA), confirms that Canadian researchers continue to be recognized as scientific leaders in the field of regenerative medicine and stem cell science.
Exploring the past, present and future of regenerative medicine
The award-winning, MEDLINE-indexed journal Regenerative Medicine has released a special focus issue on the 10th anniversary of the publication's launch highlighting the key developments in the last 10 years.
Center for Regenerative Medicine receives 3 prestigious NIH awards
The Center for Regenerative Medicine at Boston Medical Center and Boston University School of Medicine has received three prestigious awards from the National Institutes of Health to further its commitment to induced pluripotent stem cell research and education.
Pitt researchers solve mystery on how regenerative medicine works
Researchers identify mechanism by which bioscaffolds used in regenerative medicine influence cellular behavior, a question that has remained unanswered since the technology was first developed several decades ago.
Regenerative medicine improves strength and function in severe muscle injuries
Patients with severe muscle loss surgically implanted with bioscaffolds derived from pig tissue showed significant improvement in strength and range of motion, as well as evidence for skeletal muscle regeneration.
Gauging stem cells for regenerative medicine
Salk researchers and collaborators provide a new benchmark for generating the most primitive type of stem cell.
New approach for regenerative diabetes therapy
The marker Flattop subdivides the insulin-producing beta cells of the pancreas into those that maintain glucose metabolism and into immature cells that divide more frequently and adapt to metabolic changes.
Regenerative medicine offering new treatment for bronchopleural fistulas
For the first time in human application, Mayo Clinic researchers successfully closed an open wound on the upper chest caused by postoperative complications of lung removal.
Expansion of kidney progenitor cells toward regenerative medicine
The kidney is a difficult organ to regenerate. However, in a big step forward for kidney regeneration research, a collaboration between scientists from Japan and the US has successfully demonstrated a method of increasing kidney progenitor cell proliferation in vitro.

Related Regenerative Medicine Reading:

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Anthropomorphic
Do animals grieve? Do they have language or consciousness? For a long time, scientists resisted the urge to look for human qualities in animals. This hour, TED speakers explore how that is changing. Guests include biological anthropologist Barbara King, dolphin researcher Denise Herzing, primatologist Frans de Waal, and ecologist Carl Safina.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#SB2 2019 Science Birthday Minisode: Mary Golda Ross
Our second annual Science Birthday is here, and this year we celebrate the wonderful Mary Golda Ross, born 9 August 1908. She died in 2008 at age 99, but left a lasting mark on the science of rocketry and space exploration as an early woman in engineering, and one of the first Native Americans in engineering. Join Rachelle and Bethany for this very special birthday minisode celebrating Mary and her achievements. Thanks to our Patreons who make this show possible! Read more about Mary G. Ross: Interview with Mary Ross on Lash Publications International, by Laurel Sheppard Meet Mary Golda...