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Lipid Droplets: Dynamic Organelles in Metabolism and Beyond

January 22, 2016

Bethesda, MD - This FASEB SRC will bring together researchers in these lipid droplet-related fields and will capture the ongoing excitement and rapid expansion of lipid droplet research. There will be cutting-edge presentations on the biophysics of lipid droplets, on lipid droplet biogenesis and turnover, on the role of lipid droplets in exercise physiology and in various diseases, as well as on their industrial use for the production of biofuels and bioplastics. This meeting continues to represent THE major international meeting dedicated to lipid droplets.

The conference represents the diversity of science in this field, with invited speakers from North America, Europe, Brazil, Israel, China, and Australia; it will include presentations spanning basic to clinical research in academia and industry. There will be many opportunities for junior scientists to present their work and to meet and exchange ideas with experts in the field. Fifteen talks will be chosen from submitted abstracts, and there will be four poster sessions, two "meet the experts" roundtable discussions on career issues and new technologies, as well as social and recreational activities.

FASEB has announced a total of 36 Science Research Conferences (SRC) in 2016. Registration opens January 7, 2016. For more information about an SRC, view preliminary programs, or find a listing of all our 2016 SRCs, please visit http://www.faseb.org/SRC.
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Since 1982, FASEB SRC has offered a continuing series of inter-disciplinary exchanges that are recognized as a valuable complement to the highly successful society meetings. Divided into small groups, scientists from around the world meet intimately and without distractions to explore new approaches to those research areas undergoing rapid scientific changes. In efforts to expand the SRC series, potential organizers are encouraged to contact SRC staff at SRC@faseb.org. Proposal guidelines can be found at http://www.faseb.org/SRC.

FASEB is composed of 30 societies with more than 125,000 members, making it the largest coalition of biomedical research associations in the United States. Our mission is to advance health and welfare by promoting progress and education in biological and biomedical sciences through service to our member societies and collaborative advocacy.

Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology

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