Matricellular Proteins in Development, Health, and Disease

January 22, 2016

Bethesda, MD - This conference is focused on bringing together researchers from diverse fields of study with a central theme: Matricellular proteins. These proteins include but are not limited to thrombospondins and other thrombospondin repeat proteins (TSR), tenascins, osteopontin, SPARC (secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine) and SPARC-like proteins, periostin, fibulins, and the CCN family and the respective receptor and interacting proteins through which they signal. Matricellular proteins are spatially and temporally regulated components of the extracellular matrix (ECM) that have both short-range and context-specific functions that impact cell:cell interactions and cell:ECM interactions. Matricellular proteins are becoming increasingly appreciated as critical mediators of tissue homeostasis. In addition, a number of matricellular proteins have been recently recognized as key factors in pathogenesis of numerous diseases in various organs. For example, matricellular proteins regulate tumor progression, angiogenesis, immune response, calcification, wound repair, cardiovascular disease, musculoskeletal disorders, and fibrosis. Emerging roles of matricellular proteins as biomarkers of disease and in tissue engineering applications represent other areas that are rapidly expanding. Hence, understanding the cellular and molecular mechanisms of action of these proteins has generated great interest both for basic research laboratories and for developing new therapeutic applications.

This SRC is the only international meeting that focuses on the full profile of matricellular proteins and stands alone as being the single opportunity for the matricellular biology community to come together to share ideas and facilitate cross-fertilization of ideas. Interaction with scientists from around the globe on this topic is particularly advantageous for the career development of young researchers and for researchers with newly developed interests in matricellular signaling. With the emphasis placed on bringing together representatives from various fields of study, scientists can be exposed to the preceding knowledge base of the field and also have an opportunity to cross-fertilize their own research with a renewed perspective.

FASEB has announced a total of 36 Science Research Conferences (SRC) in 2016. Registration opens January 7, 2016. For more information about an SRC, view preliminary programs, or find a listing of all our 2016 SRCs, please visit http://www.faseb.org/SRC.
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Since 1982, FASEB SRC has offered a continuing series of inter-disciplinary exchanges that are recognized as a valuable complement to the highly successful society meetings. Divided into small groups, scientists from around the world meet intimately and without distractions to explore new approaches to those research areas undergoing rapid scientific changes. In efforts to expand the SRC series, potential organizers are encouraged to contact SRC staff at SRC@faseb.org. Proposal guidelines can be found at http://www.faseb.org/SRC.

FASEB is composed of 30 societies with more than 125,000 members, making it the largest coalition of biomedical research associations in the United States. Our mission is to advance health and welfare by promoting progress and education in biological and biomedical sciences through service to our member societies and collaborative advocacy.

Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology

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