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Neural mechanisms in cardiovascular regulation

January 22, 2016

Bethesda, MD - This FASEB Science Research Conference will be of great interest to researchers and clinicians seeking the most up-to-date information on neural regulation of the cardiovascular system in healthy and diseased states. By bringing together eminent clinical and basic researchers this conference will provide leading-edge information and provoke discussion on the latest technical advances in cellular interventions and device-based treatments, both in terms of efficacy and underlying mechanisms.

Sessions will cover recent findings for surgery- and instrumentation-based therapies for cardiovascular disease in both animal models and human subjects. In addition, the conference will include presentations and discussions on the use of state-of-the-art tools such as genetically encoded receptors (DREADDS) and light-activated ion channels (optogenetics) that are enabling researchers to interrogate and repair disease-related behavior of neurons that regulate cardiovascular function with unprecedented neurochemical specificity and enhanced spatial and temporal resolution.

The conference will include a wide range of topics that impact neural regulation of cardiovascular and respiratory function including mood and anxiety disorders, immune function and autoimmunity, metabolic factors related to diabetes and obesity, novel angiotensin signaling mechanisms, and beneficial and detrimental effects of exposure to hypoxia. By exploring the intimate interactions of neurons and glia, the conference will also explore non-neuronal mechanisms related to neural control of cardiovascular function. The conference will bring together pioneering established researchers with junior researchers of the next generation to interact in poster sessions, panel discussions, and social gatherings to promote future exploration of neural regulation of cardiovascular function.

FASEB has announced a total of 36 Science Research Conferences (SRC) in 2016. Registration opens Jan. 7, 2016. For more information about an SRC, view preliminary programs, or find a listing of all our 2016 SRCs, please visit http://www.faseb.org/SRC.
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Since 1982, FASEB SRC has offered a continuing series of inter-disciplinary exchanges that are recognized as a valuable complement to the highly successful society meetings. Divided into small groups, scientists from around the world meet intimately and without distractions to explore new approaches to those research areas undergoing rapid scientific changes. In efforts to expand the SRC series, potential organizers are encouraged to contact SRC staff at SRC@faseb.org. Proposal guidelines can be found at http://www.faseb.org/SRC.

FASEB is composed of 30 societies with more than 125,000 members, making it the largest coalition of biomedical research associations in the United States. Our mission is to advance health and welfare by promoting progress and education in biological and biomedical sciences through service to our member societies and collaborative advocacy.

Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology

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