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The Consortium for Orthodontic Advances in Science & Technology (COAST) -- Workshop on 'Personalized & Precision Orthodontics'

January 22, 2016

Bethesda, MD - The COAST 2016 SRC focuses on new knowledge relevant to the orthodontic field. One of the exciting prospects to emerge from the completion of the human genome in 2003, is "personalized medicine," and by extension "precision medicine." Personalized medicine involves combining unique comprehensive data - genetic, genomic, clinical and environmental - about a person to make treatment and prevention as individualized as the condition being considered.

Individualized orthodontic systems and other new and old individualized orthodontic approaches must be compared through cost benefit analyses to identify areas of needed research and technical developments that will further improve the delivery of quality orthodontic care. This sort of exploration and analyses are indicated, for example, for individual diagnostics (e.g. 2D versus 3D imaging via ionizing versus non-ionizing methods; use biomarkers and genetic profiling) as well as for individualized approaches to achieve efficient non-surgical and surgical correction of orthodontic malocclusions (e.g. effects of applied vector mechanics, customized appliances, corticotomies, robotics and fast-prototyping).

The conference will focus on ground breaking research in areas relevant to current and future orthodontic therapies. More than 20 speakers will present innovative ideas and approaches that will have an impact on orthodontic practice for the next 25 years. Topics of focus will vary from molecular management of human craniosynostosis to behavioral analyses of muscle function. Five keynote speakers will lead audience-speaker discussion and debate on how to take laboratory innovations to the chairside.

FASEB has announced a total of 36 Science Research Conferences (SRC) in 2016. Registration opens January 7, 2016. For more information about an SRC, view preliminary programs, or find a listing of all our 2016 SRCs, please visit http://www.faseb.org/SRC.
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Since 1982, FASEB SRC has offered a continuing series of inter-disciplinary exchanges that are recognized as a valuable complement to the highly successful society meetings. Divided into small groups, scientists from around the world meet intimately and without distractions to explore new approaches to those research areas undergoing rapid scientific changes. In efforts to expand the SRC series, potential organizers are encouraged to contact SRC staff at SRC@faseb.org. Proposal guidelines can be found at http://www.faseb.org/SRC.

FASEB is composed of 30 societies with more than 125,000 members, making it the largest coalition of biomedical research associations in the United States. Our mission is to advance health and welfare by promoting progress and education in biological and biomedical sciences through service to our member societies and collaborative advocacy.

Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology

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