Nav: Home

First pilot production of genetic medications to open in Russia

January 22, 2016

This will become the first GMP-certified line of such type in the country.

The necessary equipment is up and running, and the first lab samples have been produced.

Professor Albert Rizvanov eliminates, «We will be able to manufacture genetic medicines for preclinical and clinical trials and then -- for the general market. Our products can be used to treat peripheral nerves, ischemia, locomotor impairments, neurodegenerative diseases (Alzheimer's, lateral sclerosis), cirrhosis, spinal injuries. We also plan to tackle strokes and heart attacks».

Kazan University started working on genetic medications back in 2007. After that, another boost was given by the cooperation between KFU and Human Stem Cell Institute -- the sides are now planning to establish a joint venture.

Professor Rizvanov informed us that there are currently three preclinical trials being held at the University, and hopefully this one can become the fourth.

Speaking about genetic drugs, there are now only four of them certified in the world. Two of them (of Chinese origin) were designed to battle oncological diseases, the third one (by the Human Stem Cell Institute) -- against leg ischemia, and the fourth one (from Europe) -- to treat a rare lipoprotein deficiency.

Our interviewee explains the medication mechanism, «We can treat cells outside of the body and then return them into the organism, we can administer the medication internally as well. This is basically the same process. The medication contains a fragment of genetic material that is essentially a programming language for cells. So by providing this information we can make cells produce the necessary substance».
-end-


Kazan Federal University

Related Clinical Trials Articles:

Giving children a voice in clinical trials
Children as young as 8 years old with incurable cancer can reliably characterize the impact an experimental therapy has on their symptoms and quality of life -- even at the earliest stages of drug development -- making self-reported patient outcomes a potential new clinical trial endpoint.
Better health for women involved in clinical trials
Women who participate in obstetric and gynecology clinical trials experience improved health outcomes compared to those who are not involved in trials, according to research by Queen Mary University of London.
Final artificial pancreas clinical trials now open
Clinical trials are now enrolling to provide the final tests for a University of Virginia-developed artificial pancreas to automatically monitor and regulate blood-sugar levels in people with type 1 diabetes.
Why the bar needs to be raised for human clinical trials
Standards for authorizing first-time trials of drugs in humans are lax, and should be strengthened in several ways, McGill University researchers argue in a paper published today in Nature.
New drug formulary will help expedite use of agents in clinical trials
The National Cancer Institute (NCI) today launched a new drug formulary (the 'NCI Formulary') that will enable investigators at NCI-designated Cancer Centers to have quicker access to approved and investigational agents for use in preclinical studies and cancer clinical trials.
Review examines diversity in dermatology clinical trials
Racial and ethnic groups can be underrepresented in medical research.
Reshaping the future of global clinical trials practice
Researchers at the University of Liverpool have developed a new international guideline to help standardize how results from clinical trial studies are reported.
Fewer cardiovascular drugs being studied in clinical trials
The number of cardiovascular drugs in the research pipeline has declined across all phases of development in the last 20 years even as cardiovascular disease has become the No.
Sex hormones skew outcomes in clinical trials -- here's how
Clinical research often excludes females from their trials under the assumption that 'one size fits all,' that a painkiller or antidepressant will be equally effective in subjects of either sex, but a growing number of scientists are criticizing this approach.
Nearly half of pediatric clinical trials go unfinished or unpublished
Clinical trials in children commonly go either uncompleted or unpublished, finds a comprehensive study conducted by researchers at Boston Children's Hospital.

Related Clinical Trials Reading:

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Anthropomorphic
Do animals grieve? Do they have language or consciousness? For a long time, scientists resisted the urge to look for human qualities in animals. This hour, TED speakers explore how that is changing. Guests include biological anthropologist Barbara King, dolphin researcher Denise Herzing, primatologist Frans de Waal, and ecologist Carl Safina.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#SB2 2019 Science Birthday Minisode: Mary Golda Ross
Our second annual Science Birthday is here, and this year we celebrate the wonderful Mary Golda Ross, born 9 August 1908. She died in 2008 at age 99, but left a lasting mark on the science of rocketry and space exploration as an early woman in engineering, and one of the first Native Americans in engineering. Join Rachelle and Bethany for this very special birthday minisode celebrating Mary and her achievements. Thanks to our Patreons who make this show possible! Read more about Mary G. Ross: Interview with Mary Ross on Lash Publications International, by Laurel Sheppard Meet Mary Golda...